A Proper Gander At Propaganda

Truth Transcends Community

"Then a mighty strange thing happened.  Guess you could call it fate. You see, a gust of wind blew the picture frame down and it landed on the muckety-muck's head And the mice they all went crazy. For the first time they saw the lie.

It was all a hoax on just simple folks. And the muckety-muck must die. And die he did. The members of his staff they just fled. They were scared. Hah. Just not prepared." - Song: The Proper Gander. Songwriter: Bobby Darin

"Propaganda in the United States is spread by both government and media entities. Propaganda is information, ideas, or rumors deliberately spread widely to influence opinions. It's used in advertising, radio, newspaper, posters, books, television, and other media."  -  Propaganda in the United States - Wikipedia

"A man without a government is like a fish without a bicycle.” Alvaro Koplovich
Article index

Disney, DARPA, The NSA & You

Please excuse any typos you may encounter. Spell check is evil. We will correct them as we find them. Thank you, AA Morris Staff.

Welcome to The Military Industrial Entertainment Complex™: Programming the Human Mind For Centuries & Only Getting Worse...

"Haseltine worked for a decade at Walt Disney Imagineering, the company's design and development group. As such, he would seem an unlikely choice for his new government mission. But the worlds of the NSA and Walt Disney Imagineering aren't so dissimilar. Both organizations include a diverse group of top-level scientists and share a penchant for security and secrecy (Disney won't say how many scientists it employees). There's a certain institutional quality to the unmarked, drab buildings that make up the sprawling Walt Disney Imagineering complex in Glendale, Calif.

Beyond developing innovative ride systems for theme parks, Disney's research and development team also has expertise in areas with military applications, including virtual-reality technology and information systems. Disney scientists are at the forefront of interactive TV and developing systems for protecting the company against Internet piracy.

Haseltine, 50, who holds a doctorate in physiological psychology, also is no stranger to the defense world. He spent 13 years at Hughes Aircraft Co., where he also managed R&D projects and was known as a leading expert on flight simulation. He joined Disney in 1992.

His new job will not be built around family fun. His role will be to lead a research and technology team for the spy agency, a division of the Department of Defense that employs 30,000. Neither NSA nor Haseltine will detail his exact responsibilities."

"I'm taking the job because I want to contribute my skills to helping the country," said Haseltine. "I'm particularly motivated because of what happened on September 11. Under ordinary circumstances, I would never have dreamed of leaving Disney, but these aren't ordinary circumstances."

http://articles.orlandosentinel.com/2002-07-17/news/0207170165_1_walt-disney-eric-haseltine-disney-imagineering

Eric Haseltine

"Haseltine received a bachelor of arts degree in economics and psychology from the University of California, Berkeley, and a Ph.D. in physiological psychology from Indiana University. He also has a certificate in Executive Management from UCLA's Anderson School of Management. He accomplished post-doctoral work in brain research at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.

How To Kill Imaginations

Career

Haseltine spent 13 years at Hughes Aircraft, where he rose to the position of Director of Engineering. He then left for Walt Disney Imagineering in 1992, where he joined the research and development group, working on large-scale virtual-reality projects. In 1998 he was promoted to senior vice president responsible for all technology projects.[1] In 2000, he was made Executive Vice President. Haseltine was head of research and development for all of Walt Disney Imagineering [2]by the time he left in 2002 to join the National Security Agency as Director of Research. From 2005 to 2007, Haseltine was Associate Director for Science and Technology, Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI)—that organization's first—a position he described in a 2006 US News and World Reportinterview, as follows, "You can think of me as the CTO [chief technology officer] of the intelligence community".

"Haseltine is currently president, and managing partner of Haseltine Partners, LLC. He also serves on the advisory board of TTI/Vanguard."

Personal Life

Haseltine is currently engaged to be married to Chris Gilbert MD PhD. More information about Dr. Chris can be found at www.theoneminutedoctor.com.

His three distinguished siblings include William A. Haseltine, founder of the biotechnology firm Human Genome Sciences.

Patents/Publications

Haseltine's forthcoming book, Brain Candy: The Mind is Like a Box of Chocolates, will be published Fall 2016 by Oak Mill Press.

"Eric has 15 patents in optics, special effects and electronic media, and more than 100 publications in science and technical journals, the web, and Discover Magazine." [3]

  • Long Fuse, Big Bang: Achieving Long-Term Success Through Daily Victories. Hyperion, NY, 2010. ISBN 978-1-4013-2363-9

Articles

Eric Haseltine is a writer with numerous articles in Psychology Today.

1. What Sex Teaches Us About Leadership

2. Do Some Thoughts and Feelings Live Outside our Brain?

3. How to Find a Husband if You Only Have 60 Seconds

4. Sex and Leadership for Women

5. The Neuroscience of Intimacy

6. You Aren't Who You Think You Are

7. Yes, You Have a Sixth Sense, and You Should Trust It

8. Why It's Vital to Empty Your Head Every Night

Awards

Eric Haseltine - Wikipedia

Disney Culturally Programming Young Minds a Long Long Time

Nothing like turning a person's personal choices into Hollywood product. How very crass of Disney. This seems like a well intentioned way to create a new sterotype that does nothing to really promote tolerance of alternative lifestyles. Hollywood tends to be too hamfisted in its appraoch and also goes big when they should go small. It's obvious that this character is just a literal live action cartoon. That itself can be taken as an insult to gay men. Lifestyles are not cartoons and sexuality has no place in a product promoted and marketed for children.

It is Called Television Programming For A Reason

The media continues to push the idea that children need to be sexualized and even children’s cartoons have crass innuendo that would seem to be aimed at the parents, but in fact begin to “program” the child to start thinking about sex. Perhaps the sexualization of our children by television programs, films and other media is what leads to the various and rare cases of apparently unnatural behavior that the media uses to blow molehills into mountains.

This has nothing to do with lifestyle or any kind of prejudice and everything to do with common sense. Not every parent might be ready to have "that" conversation with their 6 year old.Get it?

Besides so-called lifestyles and gender preference are meant to get us to identify with some kind of identity which itself is just an artifact of culture. You are not your so-called identity. You are not a gay man because you like other men. You are a human being. Sexual preference and gender are not identities. Your physical body is a huge clue as to who is who. The media promoted noise of identity is the same thing as commercial branding and is the means of treating human beings as cattle and product and nothing more.

This is all a form of identity politics and social conditioning. This is what cultural creation looks like as it is happening.

Disney's First Openly Gay Character Arrives in Beauty and the Beastcbr.com

ONLINE CLUES AS TO WHO IS FULL OF IT: The U.S. Military

image source: image source: https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/564x/70/42/e2/7042e2a8cab4b93f54986c83aa679df2.jpg

The Department of Defense Exists To Defend The Government From Us

The battlefield is the human imagination. The war is a psychological operation based one. We are the enemy and have been considered as such for centuries.

Mario Hytten, Chief Executive Officer, Planetaire AB, Captimax Sports Media, Sweden presented at the Webinar on Mind, Thinking & Creativity on March 9, 2016 .

Ideas Matter Not Personalities

Do you think that there are online minions who are employed by Governmental Authority to infiltrate and otherwise disrupt what appears to be a growing awareness that much of what we think we know is wrong? Do you think some of the so-called "Truth Movement" personas might be "Controlled Opposition"?

Do you think there could be plants among us? In real life and online? Does that sound paranoid to you? 

Below is an excerpt from a paper by Cass R. Sunstein and Adrian Vermeule. Cass R. Sunstein is a bit of a "big deal".

"Cass Robert Sunstein (born September 21, 1954) is an American legal scholar, particularly in the fields of constitutional lawadministrative lawenvironmental law, and law and behavioral economics, who was the Administrator of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs in the Obama administration from 2009 to 2012. For 27 years, Sunstein taught at the University of Chicago Law School. Sunstein is the Robert Walmsley University Professor at Harvard Law School.

Studies of legal publications between 2009 and 2014 found Sunstein to be the most frequently cited American legal scholar by a wide margin, followed by Erwin Chemerinsky and Richard A. Epstein."

Cass Sunstein - Wikipedia 

Growing The Plant

Below is an excerpt from this paper. The link to the whole thing is below. Check out Cass Sunstein's wikiepida link as well. There is clear historical evidence that the old snake oil salesman tactic of having a plant (in  one form or another) in the audience has always been used to keep the mass public in line. Personally we do not think it wise to join "communities" as we think that such shepherding enables us to be more easily manipulated and controlled. Crowd psychology is a subject we recommend people read up on.

see: The Crowd: A Study of the Popular Mind - Wikipedia

The Crowd: A Study of the Popular Mind : Gustave Le Bon : Free ...

Freedom Is

We think we need to pay a lot less in Taxes and we think we need a lot less Government. We also think we are all in this together, so we don't care if someone is or isn't a so-called "shill". We just want people to be aware of the various forms of deception that one can come across. We do not subscribe to the divide and conquer mentality, nor do we think we need "thought police". 

The Mainstream Media itself can be a source of good information, despite all the obvious noise and silliness. So can an on or off-line "shill" or "plant". If we learn to the hard lesson of critically thinking for ourselves and we also learn to care a lot less about what other people think and do, we can filter the noise out and come to our own individual conclusions that do not rely on the external authority of others.

"Conspiracy Theories"

"Introduction

“The truth is out there", conspiracy theories are all around us. In August 2004, a poll by Zogby International showed that 49 percent of New York City residents, with a margin of error of 3.5 percent, believed that officials of the U.S. government “knew in advance that attacks were planned on or around September 11, 2001, and that they consciously failed to act.” In a Scripps-Howard Poll in 2006, with an error margin of 4 percent, some 36 percent of respondents assented to the claim that “federal officials either participated in the attacks on the World Trade Center or took no action to stop them.”3 Sixteen percent said that it was either very likely or somewhat likely that “the collapse of the twin towers in New York was aided by explosives secretly planted in the two buildings.”  "

"3. Cognitive infiltration

Rather than taking the continued existence of the hard core as a constraint, and addressing itself solely to the third-party mass audience, government might undertake (legal) tactics for breaking up the tight cognitive clusters of extremist theories, arguments and rhetoric that are produced by the hard core and reinforce it in turn. One promising tactic is cognitive infiltration of extremist groups. By this we do not mean 1960s-style infiltration with a view to surveillance and collecting information, possibly for use in future prosecutions. Rather, we mean that government efforts might succeed in weakening or even breaking up the ideological and epistemological complexes that constitute these networks and groups. 

How might this tactic work? Recall that extremist networks and groups, including the groups that purvey conspiracy theories, typically suffer from a kind of crippled epistemology. Hearing only conspiratorial accounts of government behavior, their members become ever more prone to believe and generate such accounts. Informational and reputational cascades, group polarization, and selection effects suggest that the generation of ever-more-extreme views within these groups can be dampened or reversed by the introduction of cognitive diversity. We suggest a role for government efforts, and agents, in introducing such diversity. Government agents (and their allies) might enter chat rooms, online social networks, or even real-space groups and attempt to undermine percolating conspiracy theories by raising doubts about their factual premises, causal logic or implications for political action. "

http://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/files/387.pdf

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2011/mar/17/us-spy-operation-social-networks

We Are Not Afraid of Cartoon "Ghosts" We Get The "Jest"

Fort Meade is the Home to the Supposed "Intelligence" Agency that is assigned the task of security not for us, but for the corporate entity known as the USA. We are the 'enemy' in this 'mind war'.

"The National Security Agency (NSA) is an intelligence organization of the United States government, responsible for global monitoring, collection, and processing of information and data for foreign intelligence and counterintelligence purposes, a discipline known as signals intelligence (SIGINT). NSA is concurrently charged with protection of U.S. government communications and information systems against penetration and network warfare.[8][9] Although many of NSA's programs rely on "passive" electronic collection, the agency is authorized to accomplish its mission through active clandestine means,[10] among which are physically bugging electronic systems[11] and allegedly engaging in sabotage through subversive software.[12][13] Moreover, NSA maintains physical presence in a large number of countries across the globe, where its Special Collection Service (SCS) inserts eavesdropping devices in difficult-to-reach places. SCS collection tactics allegedly encompass "close surveillance, burglary, wiretapping, breaking and entering"."

National Security Agency - Wikipedia

Defense Information Systems Agency: Headquarters - Fort MeadeMaryland, U.S.

"The Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA), known as the Defense Communications Agency (DCA) until 1991, is a United States Department of Defense (DoD) combat support agency composed of military, federal civilians, and contractors. DISA provides information technology (IT) and communications support to the PresidentVice PresidentSecretary of Defense, the military services, the combatant commands, and any individual or system contributing to the defense of the United States.

According to the mission statement on the agency website, DISA “provides, operates, and assures command and control, information sharing capabilities, and a globally accessible enterprise information infrastructure in direct support to joint warfighters, National level leaders, and other mission and coalition partners across the full spectrum of operations.” DISA’s vision is “Information superiority in defense of our Nation.”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Defense_Information_Systems_Agency

DISINFO SCHOOL

"The Defense Information School, or DINFOS, is a United States Department of Defense (DoD) school located at Fort George G. Meade, Maryland. DINFOS fulfills the Department of Defense's need for an internal corps of professional journalists, broadcasters, and public affairs professionals.[1] Members from all branches of the U.S. military, DoD civilians and international military personnel attend DINFOS for training in public affairs, print journalism, photojournalism, photography, television and radio broadcasting, lithography, equipment maintenance and various forms of multimedia. The American Council on Education recommends college credit for most DINFOS courses."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Defense_Information_School

Fort George G. Meade[4] is a United States Army installation that includes the Defense Information School, the Defense Media Activity, the United States Army Field Band, and the headquarters of United States Cyber Command, the National Security Agency, the Defense Courier Service, and Defense Information Systems Agency headquarters. It is named for George G. Meade, a general from the U.S. Civil War, who served as commander of the Army of the Potomac. The fort's smaller census-designated place includes support facilities such as schools, housing, and the offices of the Military Intelligence Civilian Excepted Career Program (MICECP).”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_George_G._Meade

War - What is it Good For?

Hollywood.

The Military is the Place to Go To Learn How to Act, Sing & Dance

SS = Special Services Trained at Fort Meade

"Special Services are the entertainment branch of the American military. The unit was created on 22 July 1940 by the War Department as part of the Army Service Forces.[1] Special Services would not only use their own specially trained and talented troops but would often engage local performers. 

Special Services were one of the few U.S. Army units to be integrated during World War II. Special Services opened their first Recreational Officer school at Fort Meade Maryland on 1 April 1942."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special_Services_(entertainment)

"The United States Army Field Band of Washington, D.C. is a touring musical organization of the United States Army. Each year, the Army Field Band performs more than 400 concerts and makes thousands of appearances before audiences of all ages. From America's largest cities to her smallest heartland communities, "The Musical Ambassadors of the Army" tell the story of the Army.

The soldier-musicians of the Field Band have appeared live, on the radio, and on television in all 50 states, and have performed in 25 foreign countries on four continents. They are the most traveled musical organization of the United States military. Stationed at Ft. Meade, MD, the Army Field Band consists of four performing components: The Concert Band, The Soldiers' Chorus, the Jazz Ambassadors, and The Volunteers. The Army Field Band's operations component works in garrison at Ft. Meade and organizes all tours."

United States Army Field Band - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

"United States Cyber Command (USCYBERCOM) is an armed forces sub-unified command subordinate to United States Strategic Command. The command centralizes command of cyberspace operations, organizes existing cyber resources and synchronizes defense of U.S. military networks. Cyber Command was created in 2009 at the National Security Agency (NSA) headquarters in Fort Meade, Maryland. It uses NSA networks and has been headed by the Director of the National Security Agency since its inception. While originally created with a defensive mission in mind, it has increasingly been viewed as an offensive force." 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Cyber_Command

"Fort George G. Meade is a United States Army installation that includes the Defense Information School, the Defense Media Activity, the United States Army Field Band, and the headquarters of United States Cyber Command, the National Security Agency, the Defense Courier Service, and Defense Information Systems Agency headquarters. It is named for George G. Meade, a general from the U.S. Civil War, who served as commander of the Army of the Potomac. The fort's smaller census-designated place includes support facilities such as schools, housing, and the offices of the Military Intelligence Civilian Excepted Career Program (MICECP)." "The consolidation of the Defense Information School and the Defense Visual Information School in fiscal 1996 and further consolidation with the Defense Photography School in fiscal 1998 created a single focal point in the Department of Defense for these specialties fields. Advancements in information technology and recent base realignment and closure initiatives have contributed to the evolution of the school. The result is a single school proud of its historical roots and dedicated to serving the diverse requirements for public affairs, broadcasting and visual information."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_George_G._Meade

"The Military Intelligence Civilian Excepted Career Program or MICECP, is a Department of the Army Headquarters career management program administered by the US Army Field Support Center of the US Army Intelligence and Security Command (INSCOM). The Military Intelligence Civilian Excepted Career Program is tasked with recruiting, training and developing a dedicated civilian intelligence workforce to conduct sensitive intelligence and counterintelligence operations missions worldwide. The program operates from Fort George G. Meade, Maryland."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Military_Intelligence_Civilian_Excepted_Career_Program

DARPA

"The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is an agency of the U.S. Department of Defense responsible for the development of emerging technologies for use by the military.

DARPA was created in February 1958 as the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) by President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Its purpose was to formulate and execute research and development projects to expand the frontiers of technology and science, with the aim to reach beyond immediate military requirements.[3] The administration was created in response to the Soviet launching of Sputnik 1 in 1957, and DARPA's mission was to ensure U.S. militarytechnology would be more sophisticated than that of the nation's potential enemies.

The name of the organization changed several times from its founding name ARPA: DARPA (March 1972), ARPA (February 1993), and DARPA (March 1996).

DARPA is independent from other military research and development and reports directly to senior Department of Defense management. DARPA has about 240 employees, of whom 13 are in management, and close to 140 are technical staff.[citation needed]

DARPA-funded projects have provided significant technologies that influenced many non-military fields, such as computer networking and graphical user interfaces in information technology."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DARPA

OUR TAX DOLLARS AT WORK: DARPA/DISNEY PROJECTS - Video Games!

SHALL WE PLAY WARGAMES?

"In the mid-90s, in a bid to streamline government defense spending, there was a conscious decision by the U.S. military to move away from sub-contracting to outside interests for their development needs. Instead they began a campaign to bring skilled people into the forces to foster their own R&D culture and that had major implications for the relationship between the military and entertainment industries based particularly in their joint interest in games. The military are very familiar with the reality of simulation, particularly as games – they have been part of their training about strategy as long as commanders have coordinated groups of people for large-scale combat. As Michelle Barron notes:

Games of all sorts – video games, board games, and games kids play in the backyard – have historically been about conflict and warfare. Whether you’re playing Chess, which is a simulated battlefield, or a game like Go, an ancient Chinese game that is also a simulated battlefield, or you’re playing a board game like Risk or Axis and Allies, you’re essentially at war and you’re playing out military conflict. The history continues with electronic games. (Barron, 2003)

Further Tim Lenoir and Henry Loward also point out that the:

…notion of the war game as a simulation, as an imitation of combat by other means, preceded the use of computer-based models for encoding rules, data, and procedures. War games have taken many forms ranging from large-scale field exercises to abstract strategy games played with maps, counters or miniatures. (Lenoir and Loward, 2002)

In particular during the twentieth century, air crew training came to depend on the use of simulators that allowed pilots to practice flying without putting their lives, or more importantly, their expensive aircraft in danger. Flight simulators made a quick transition to the digital and many early computers shipped with games that gave the experience of flying. Lenoir and Loward track the development of the initially tenuous links between the computer simulation industry and the US military and the subsequent development of intimate connections between them (2002). These connections share an interest in computing technology that could deliver optimal performance, high reality simulations.

The military have been dabbling directly in the commercial computer game environment for less than a decade. In 1996, Marine Corps Commandant General Charles C. Krulak issued a directive suggesting that Marines use PC-based wargames to improve military thinking about the tactics and techniques of modern warfare (Lister, 2003). This led to the first concerted attempt at harnessing computer gaming technology and led to the military release of an add-on pack (a mod) for Id Software’s Doom II. The mod is now readily available to download from the World Wide Web. You still need a copy of Doom II in order to use the mod, but once you have installed the modification the whole game changes into a real-life simulation where the monsters become terrorists and the locations become realistic (ID Software, 1997). In 2001 the US Military assembled a team of designers (under the name Rival Interactive) to create a real-time strategy combat game called Real War in the same vein as Command and Conquer. The purpose of Real War was to teach soldiers how to think like commanders (Lenoir and Loward, 2002).

Such moves, testing the waters of commercial technologies, planted the seeds for the eventual development of the Department of Defense funded computer game America’s Army by the MOVES Institute, based at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California. In a pre-design briefing, the creators expressed their goal for the project (which exists in two parts: Operations and Soldiers) as two-fold: ‘We conceived America’s Army: Soldiers as a realistic look at army personal and career opportunities via sophisticated role-playing… Our goal within America’s Army:Operations was to demonstrate life in the infantry’ (Lenoir and Loward, 2002).

In practice, the educational value of the project seems incidental to what America’s Army: Operations actually is: a multiplayer first-person-shooter game. As anyone who has played any multi-user shooter game knows, when you get people in a death-match game it becomes a free-for-all where expert players race through and show off their immensely honed skills with the game interface by slaughtering other players. In a typical training scenario, America’s Army will deploy the “team” of marines near the zone of engagement. The first thing the user learns when playing is that you can’t afford to be flippant about things. One well-aimed shot to the avatar’s vital zones and it’s lights out. As the player’s avatar expires, the corpse slumps to the ground (or is thrown forward like a crash-test-dummy, depending on the physics of the weapon causing digital demise). Then for the remaining time that the skirmish plays out (until one side achieves the objective or a whole team is defeated), the user is detached from the game and becomes an “observer” who can change the camera view but otherwise cannot affect the game."   http://one.fibreculturejournal.org/fcj-004-the-military-entertainment-complex-a-new-facet-of-information-warfare

The 5 Most Realistic War Games Ever HD Tactile Shooter

Want To Bet There is Even Better Technology Hidden Away Behind The Closed Doors of Security Clearances and Non-Disclosure Agreements?

Coloring The Human Mind: The Power and Importance of Color

Human Psych 101: Why Full Color Images Matter

"Color psychology is the study of hues as a determinant of human behavior. Color influences perceptions that are not obvious, such as the taste of food. Colors can also enhance the effectiveness of placebos. For example, red or orange pills are generally used as stimulants. Color can indeed influence a person; however, it is important to remember that these effects differ between people. Factors such as gender, age, and culture can influence how an individual perceives color. For example, males reported that red colored outfits made women seem more attractive, while women answered that the color of a male's outfit did not affect his attractiveness.

Color psychology is also widely used in marketing and branding. Many marketers see color as an important part of marketing because color can be used to influence consumers' emotions and perceptions of goods and services. Companies also use color when deciding on brand logos. These logos seem to attract more customers when the color of the brand logo matches the personality of the goods or services, such as the color pink being heavily used on Victoria's Secret branding. However, colors are not only important for logos and products, but also for window displays in stores. Research shows that warm colors tended to attract spontaneous purchasers, despite cooler colors being more favorable."

"Since color is an important factor in the visual appearance of products as well as in brand recognition, color psychology has become important to marketing. Recent work in marketing has shown that color can be used to communicate brand personality.

Marketers must be aware of the application of color in different media (e.g. print vs. web), as well as the varying meanings and emotions that a particular audience can assign to color. Even though there are attempts to classify consumer response to different colors, everyone perceives color differently. The physiological and emotional effect of color in each person is influenced by several factors such as past experiences, culture, religion, natural environment, gender, race, and nationality. When making color decisions, it is important to determine the target audience in order to convey the right message. Color decisions can influence both direct messages and secondary brand values and attributes in any communication. Color should be carefully selected to align with the key message and emotions being conveyed in a piece.[16]

Research on the effects of color on product preference and marketing shows that product color could affect consumer preference and hence purchasing culture. Most results show that it is not a specific color that attracts all audiences, but that certain colors are deemed appropriate for certain products."

Color psychology - Wikipedia

Full Color Moving Images With Sound - The Real Atom Bomb and Weapon of Mass Social Control

This is sample footage of the earliest surviving colour videotape recording which is the Dwight Eisenhower inaugural address to WRC-TV on 22nd May 1958. The first 15 minutes of this event was shot in B&W which you see the president arriving to the building and the news reporter giving details of the event, then about nearly 15 minutes in Robert Sarnoff hits the colour switch and on comes the colour.

1950'S BEGINNING TO GETTING LOST IN SPACE: FORMER GENERAL NEWS REEL GUY AS FIRST COMPUTER GENERATED PRESIDENT

"The most famous UNIVAC product was the UNIVAC I mainframe computer of 1951, which became known for predicting the outcome of the U.S. presidential election the following year. This incident is particularly noteworthy because the computer predicted an Eisenhower landslide when traditional pollsters all called it for Adlai Stevenson.[1] The numbers were so skewed that CBS's news boss in New York, Mickelson, decided the computer was in error and refused to allow the prediction to be read. Instead they showed some staged theatrics that suggested the computer was not responsive, and announced it was predicting 8-7 odds for an Eisenhower win (the actual prediction was 100-1). When the predictions proved true and Eisenhower won a landslide within 1% of the initial prediction, Charles Collingwood, the on-air announcer, embarrassingly announced that they had covered up the earlier prediction."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UNIVAC#Univac_history_and_structure

A Long History of Playing Games - Why Fight Wars Among Family & Friends When You Can Fake it With Parlor Games?

Drawing inspiration from chess, Hellwig, Master of Pages to the Duke of Brunswick, created a battle emulation game in 1780. According to Max Boot's book War Made New (2006, pg 122), sometime between 1803 and 1809, the Prussian General Staff developed war games, with staff officers moving metal pieces around on a game table (with blue pieces representing their forces and red pieces those of the enemy), using dice rolls to indicate random chance and with a referee scoring the results. Increasingly realistic variations became part of military training in the 19th century in many nations, and were called Kriegsspiel or "wargame".

Wargames or military exercises remain an important part of military training today.

Modern wargaming originated with the military need to study warfare and to 'reenact' old battles for instructional purposes. The stunning Prussian victory over the Second French Empire in the Franco-Prussian War of 1870-1871 is sometimes partly credited to the training of Prussian officers with the game Kriegsspiel, which was invented around 1811 and gained popularity with many officers in the Prussian army. These first wargames were played with dice which represented "friction", or the intrusion of less than ideal circumstances during a real war (including morale, weather, the fog of war, etc.), though this was usually replaced by an umpire who used his own combat experience to determine the results.”

"The first specific non-military wargame club was started in Oxford, England, in the 19th century."[3] Naval enthusiast and analyst Fred T. Jane came up with a set of rules for depicting naval actions with the use of model ships, or miniatures around 1898 (Reprinted 2008). The 1905/6 edition of Jane's Fighting Ships includes a revised edition for "The Naval War Game".[4]

H.G. Wells' books Floor Games (1911) and Little Wars (1913) were attempts to codify rules for fighting battles with toy soldiers (miniatures), and make them available to the general public. They were very simple games, and in some ways just provide a context for shooting spring-loaded toy cannons at toy soldiers, but "in his Appendix to Little Wars, Wells speaks of the changes required to convert his admittedly simplistic rules into a more rigorous Kriegspiel."[5] However, Wells also states in his rules that combat "should be by actual gun and rifle fire and not by computation. Things should happen and not be decided," in opposition to the general nature of Kriegspiel play.

In 1940 Fletcher Pratt's Naval War Game was first published. The game started in New York, but other clubs formed around the USA. Jack Coggins was invited by Pratt to participate, and recalled that Pratt's game involved dozens of tiny wooden ships—built to a scale of about one inch to 50 feet—spread over the living room floor of his apartment. Their maneuvers and the results of their battles were calculated via a complex mathematical formula, with scale distances marked off with tape measures.[6] The game's popularity grew and moved to using a ballroom for games with 60 or more players per side.[7] The game was respected by the Naval War College and serving naval officers regularly participated in games[8] For an evaluation of the Fletcher Pratt Game versus reality see Chapter 10 of The Fletcher Pratt Naval Wargame book. link

All of these games were meant to be accessible to the general public, but actual play was made difficult owing to the expense of purchasing an army or navy's worth of miniatures. As leisure time and disposable income generally rose through the 20th Century, miniatures games slowly gained a following. Most gaming groups informally wrote and/or revised their own rules, which were never published.

A mass market emerges

In 1955 Jack Scruby started producing miniatures using RTV rubber molds, which greatly reduced their expense, and he turned this into a business (Scruby Miniatures) in 1957 and started publishing War Game Digest.[9] It, and its successors, put fellow miniatures enthusiasts in touch with each other, and provided a forum for ideas and locally produced rules to be shared with the rest of the hobby.

Around the same time in the UK Donald Featherstone began writing an influential series of books on wargaming, which represented the first mainstream published contribution to wargaming since H.G Wells. Titles included : Wargames, Advanced Wargames, Solo Wargaming, Wargame Campaigns, Battles with Model Tanks, Skirmish Wargaming. Such was the popularity of such titles that other authors were able to have published wargaming titles. This output of published wargaming titles from British authors coupled with the emergence at the same time of several manufacturers providing suitable wargame miniatures (e.g. Miniature Figurines, Hinchliffe, Peter Laing, Garrisson, Skytrex, Davco, Heroic & Ros) was responsible for the huge upsurge of popularity of the hobby in the late 1960s and into the 1970s.[10]

Meanwhile, the first modern mass-market wargame, based on cardboard counters and maps, was designed and published by Charles S. Roberts in 1952.[11] After nearly breaking even on Tactics, he decided to found the Avalon Hill Game Company as a publisher of intelligent games for adults, and is called "The father of board wargaming". The modern commercial board wargaming industry is considered to have begun with the publication of Tactics II in 1958, and the founding of The General Magazine by Avalon Hill in 1964.

In 1959, Diplomacy was released commercially after being developed by Allan B. Calhamer in 1954.[12] Unlike war games to date, it focused primary attention on the dynamics of alliances and betrayals,[13] and avoided the use of dice or other sources of random effects. It was played by John F. Kennedy and Henry Kissinger[14] and the latter has said it was his favorite game.[15]

In 1961, Avalon Hill published Roberts' Gettysburg, which is considered to be the first board wargame based entirely on a historical battle. D-Day and Chancellorsville, the first commercial games to use a hexagonal mapboard, were also published that year.

Avalon Hill had a very conservative publishing schedule, typically about two titles a year, and wargames were only about half their line. During the late 1960s, a number of small magazines dedicated to the hobby appeared, along with new game companies. The most important of these were undoubtedly Strategy & Tactics, and the company founded to save it from failing: Simulations Publications, Inc. (SPI). Under SPI, S&T started including a new game in every issue of the magazine, which along with the regular games SPI was publishing vastly increased the number of wargames available.

The Golden Age (1970s)[edit]

Coupled with an aggressive advertising campaign, this caused a tremendous rise in the popularity of wargaming in the early 1970s, with a large number of new companies starting up. Two of these would last for some years: Game Designers' Workshop (GDW), and Tactical Studies Rules (TSR). TSR's medieval era miniatures game, Chainmail (1971) included a fantasy supplement that led to a new phenomenon that would become much bigger than its parent hobby, role-playing games (RPGs). (For a better look at these developments see the history of role-playing games.)

The 1970s can be considered the 'Golden Age of Wargaming',[16] with a large number of new companies publishing an even larger number of games throughout the decade, powered by an explosive rise in the number of people playing wargames. Avalon Hill's PanzerBlitz (1970), Panzer Leader (1974), and Squad Leader (1977) were particularly popular during this time, with their innovative geomorphic mapboard system. Wargames began to diversify in subject matter, with the first science-fiction wargame (Galactic Warfare, published in the UK by Davco) appearing in 1973 and one of the longest lasting and most successful, Star Fleet Battles, published by Task Force Games, appearing in 1979. Wargames also diversified in size during the decade with both microgames such as Steve Jackson's Ogre that had one small map, about 100 pieces and a complexity that permitted games to be completed in about an hour, and "monster games" such as "War in Europe" with over a dozen large maps and thousands of pieces, requiring dozens of hours to complete.[17]

A smaller but continuing presence[edit]

The boom came to an end, and was followed by the usual bust in the early 1980s, most markedly with the acquisition of SPI by TSR in 1982. The hobby never truly recovered from this, and is today much smaller than it was during the 1970s.[18][19] Numerous factors have been implicated in the decline, including the rise of gaming alternatives (such as RPGs), the ever increasing complexity of wargames, and changing demographics and lifestyles.[20]

During the 1980s, much of the market for wargames was dominated by roleplaying games. Then, when personal computers became available, gamers could simply "sit down and play" without learning masses of rules, clearing physical space, and finding and coordinating schedules with opponents. However, in 1983 Games Workshop published Warhammer Fantasy Battle, initially as a "Mass-combat Role Playing Game", which quickly moved to dominate the fantasy wargaming market. When collectible card games arrived in the 1990s, the gaming market became even more competitive. By this time, many wargame publishers were already long gone.

Despite the decline, wargaming continues to survive in different forms. Advanced Squad Leader (1985) became a niche hobby in and of itself, and Axis and Allies (1984) was very popular with the mass market audience and Games Workshop's Warhammer Fantasy Battle (1983) spawned a long-lasting line popular miniatures games including the successive editions of Warhammer and the science-fantasy Warhammer 40,000 game. The genre of 'card-driven games' emerged with the publication of We the People by AH in 1994, and continues in current releases from GMT. Battle Cry (2000) and Memoir '44 (2004) proved that light wargames can still be commercially successful, as long as the rules are clear and accessible, and the components are high in quality. Block wargames, such as those published by Columbia Games remain quite popular. Companies like GMT Games and Multi-Man Publishing continue to survive and publish highly detailed hex and counter wargames.”

Wargaming - Wikipedia

Origins of Modern Social Control Programs:

Play & Games Shape Social Personas

"(George H.) Mead theorized that human beings begin their understanding of the social world through "play" and "game". "Play" comes first in the child's development. The child takes different roles he/she observes in "adult" society, and plays them out to gain an understanding of the different social roles. For instance, he first plays the role of policeman and then the role of thief while playing "Cops and Robbers," and plays the role of doctor and patient when playing "Doctor." As a result of such play, the child learns to become both subject and object and begins to become able to build a self. However, it is a limited self because the child can only take the role of distinct and separate others, they still lack a more general and organized sense of themselves.[4]:360

In the next stage, the game stage, it is required that a person develop a full sense of self. Whereas in the play stage the child takes on the role of distinct others, in the game stage the child must take the role of everyone else involved in the game. Furthermore, these roles must have a definite relationship to one another. To illustrate the game stage, Mead gives his famous example of a baseball game:

But in a game where a number of individuals are involved, then the child taking one role must be ready to take the role of everyone else. If he gets in a ball nine he must have the responses of each position involved in his own position. He must know what everyone else is going to do in order to carry out his own play. He has to take all of these roles. They do not all have to be present in consciousness at the same time, but at some moments he has to have three or four individuals present in his own attitude, such as the one who is going to throw the ball, the one who is going to catch it and so on. These responses must be, in some degree, present in his own make-up. In the game, then, there is a set of responses of such others so organized that the attitude of one calls out the appropriate attitudes of the other. (Mead, 1934/1962:151)

In the game stage, organization begins and definite personalities start to emerge. Children begin to become able to function in organized groups and most importantly, to determine what they will do within a specific group.[4]:360–361 Mead calls this the child's first encounter with "the generalized other", which is one of the main concepts Mead proposes for understanding the emergence of the (social) self in human beings. "The generalized other" can be thought of as understanding the given activity and the actors' place within the activity from the perspective of all the others engaged in the activity. Through understanding "the generalized other" the individual understands what kind of behavior is expected, appropriate and so on, in different social settings.

How does perspective taking occur according to Mead? It has been argued that social acts (such as games and routine forms of social interaction) enable perspective taking through 'position exchange'.[29] Assuming that games and routine social acts have differentiated social positions, and that these positions create our cognitive perspectives, then it might be that by moving between roles in a game (e.g. between hiding and seeking or buying and selling) we come to learn about the perspective of the other. This new interpretation of Mead's account of taking the perspective of the other has experimental support"

A Brief History of Psychological Operations

"George Herbert Mead (February 27, 1863 – April 26, 1931) was an American philosophersociologist and psychologist, primarily affiliated with the University of Chicago, where he was one of several distinguished pragmatists. He is regarded as one of the founders of social psychology and of what has come to be referred to as the Chicago sociological tradition."

"In a career spanning more than 40 years, Mead wrote almost constantly and published numerous articles and book reviews in both philosophy and psychology. However, he did not publish any books. Following his death, several of his students put together and edited four volumes from records of Mead's social psychology course at the University of Chicago, his lecture notes, and his numerous unpublished papers. The four volumes are: Mead's 1930 Carus Lectures, edited by Charles W. Morris; The Philosophy of the Present (1932), edited by Arthur E. Murphy; Mind, Self and Society (1934), edited by Charles W. MorrisMovements of Thought in the Nineteenth Century (1936), edited by Merritt H. Moore; and The Philosophy of the Act (1938)."

"Much of Mead's work focused on the development of the self and the objectivity of the world within the social realm: he insisted that "the individual mind can exist only in relation to other minds with shared meanings" (Mead 1982: 5).

The two most important roots of Mead's work, and of symbolic interactionism in general, are the philosophy of pragmatism and social (as opposed to psychological) behaviorism (i.e.: Mead was concerned with the stimuli of gestures and social objects with rich meanings rather than bare physical objects which psychological behaviourists considered stimuli). Pragmatism is a wide ranging philosophical position from which several aspects of Mead's influences can be identified.

Creating a Virtual World

There are four main tenets of pragmatism: see Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy First, to pragmatists true reality does not exist "out there" in the real world, it "is actively created as we act in and toward the world. Second, people remember and base their knowledge of the world on what has been useful to them and are likely to alter what no longer "works." Third, people define the social and physical "objects" they encounter in the world according to their use for them. Lastly, if we want to understand actors, we must base that understanding on what people actually do. Three of these ideas are critical to symbolic interactionism:

  1. the focus on the interaction between the actor and the world
  2. a view of both the actor and the world as dynamic processes and not static structures and
  3. the actor's ability to interpret the social world.

Thus, to Mead and symbolic interactionists, consciousness is not separated from action and interaction, but is an integral part of both.

Mead's theories in part, based on pragmatism and behaviorism, were transmitted to many graduate students at the University of Chicago who then went on to establish symbolic interactionism."

Social Behavior Games

"Mead was a very important figure in 20th century social philosophy. One of his most influential ideas was the emergence of mind and self from the communication process between organisms, discussed in Mind, Self and Society, also known as social behaviorism.[21] This concept of how the mind and self emerge from the social process of communication by signs founded the symbolic interactionist school of sociology. Rooted intellectually in Hegelian dialectics and process philosophy, Mead, like Dewey, developed a more materialist process philosophy that was based upon human action and specifically communicative action. Human activity is, in a pragmatic sense, the criterion of truth, and through human activity meaning is made. Joint activity, including communicative activity, is the means through which our sense of self is constituted. The essence of Mead's social behaviorism is that mind is not a substance located in some transcendent realm, nor is it merely a series of events that takes place within the human physiological structure. This approach opposed the traditional view of the mind as separate from the body. The emergence of mind is contingent upon interaction between the human organism and its social environment; it is through participation in the social act of communication that individuals realize their potential for significantly symbolic behavior, that is, thought."

"Mind, in Mead’s terms, is the individualized focus of the communication process. It is linguistic behavior on the part of the individual. There is, then, no “mind or thought without language;” and language (the content of mind) “is only a development and product of social interaction” (Mind, Self and Society 191-192). Thus, mind is not reducible to the neurophysiology of the organic individual, but is emergent in “the dynamic, ongoing social process” that constitutes human experience (Mind, Self and Society 7)."

You Are a Socially Programmed & Reinforced 'Artificial Intelligence'

The Individual is A Social Process

"A final piece of Mead's social theory is the mind as the individual importation of the social process.  Mead states, "The self is a social process," meaning that there are series of actions that goes on in the mind to help formulate one's complete self. As previously discussed, Mead presented the self and the mind in terms of a social process. As gestures are taken in by the individual organism, the individual organism also takes in the collective attitudes of others, in the form of gestures, and reacts accordingly with other organized attitudes. This process is characterized by Mead as the "I" and the "Me". The "Me" is the social self and the "I" is the response to the "Me." In other words, the "I" is the response of an individual to the attitudes of others, while the "me" is the organized set of attitudes of others which an individual assumes. Mead develops William James' distinction between the "I" and the "me." The "me" is the accumulated understanding of "the generalized other" i.e. how one thinks one's group perceives oneself etc. The "I" is the individual's impulses. The "I" is self as subject; the "me" is self as object. The "I" is the knower, the "me" is the known. The mind, or stream of thought, is the self-reflective movements of the interaction between the "I" and the "me." There is neither "I" nor "me" in the conversation of gestures; the whole act is not yet carried out, but the preparation takes place in this field of gesture. These dynamics go beyond selfhood in a narrow sense, and form the basis of a theory of human cognition. For Mead the thinking process is the internalized dialogue between the "I" and the "me." Mead rooted the self’s “perception and meaning” deeply and sociologically in "a common praxis of subjects" (Joas 1985: 166) found specifically in social encounters. Understood as a combination of the 'I' and the 'me', Mead’s self proves to be noticeably entwined within a sociological existence. For Mead, existence in community comes before individual consciousness. First one must participate in the different social positions within society and only subsequently can one use that experience to take the perspective of others and thus become self-conscious."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Herbert_Mead

The Key To Social Control: Monkey See Monkey Do  -  Parrot Hear Parrot Say

Online community building activity is the latest 'fad' in social control techniques. Human beings tend to emulate and copy each other's behavior. This basic psychological phenomena is used to get us to buy into all sorts of ideas and concepts that may or may not be important to our lives. Advertising is predicated upon the foundational idea that human beings copy each other's behavior and that we seek to be like those we see put forth as idols of one kind or another. Marketing and advertising are the modern ways of saying 'propaganda' of course. Public relations is about perception management that leads to the desired public behavioral responses.

The primary objective of the military is to get us the public to be docile and willing and largely unknowing, participants in our society and culture. We are to be literally programmed into being mindless zombies of one sort or another.

Human psychology is a very important area of study. The battlefield really is the human mind. Here is the basis for all the forms of mass media public relations we are subjected to.

Mirror Mirror on The Wall

"A mirror neuron is a neuron that fires both when an animal acts and when the animal observes the same action performed by another. Thus, the neuron "mirrors" the behavior of the other, as though the observer were itself acting. Such neurons have been directly observed in primate species Birds have been shown to have imitative resonance behaviors and neurological evidence suggests the presence of some form of mirroring system. In humans, brain activity consistent with that of mirror neurons has been found in the premotor cortex, the supplementary motor area, the primary somatosensory cortex and the inferior parietal cortex.

The function of the mirror system in humans is a subject of much speculation. Some researchers in cognitive neuroscience and cognitive psychology consider that this system provides the physiological mechanism for the perception/action coupling (see the common coding theory).[3] They argue that mirror neurons may be important for understanding the actions of other people, and for learning new skills by imitation. Some researchers speculate that mirror systems may simulate observed actions, and thus contribute to theory of mind skills,[7][8] while others relate mirror neurons to language abilities.[9] Neuroscientists such as Marco Iacoboni (UCLA) have argued that mirror neuron systems in the human brain help us understand the actions and intentions of other people. In a study published in March 2005 Iacoboni and his colleagues reported that mirror neurons could discern whether another person who was picking up a cup of tea planned to drink from it or clear it from the table.[10] In addition, Iacoboni has argued that mirror neurons are the neural basis of the human capacity for emotions such as empathy.["

"The first animal in which researchers have studied mirror neurons individually is the macaque monkey. In these monkeys, mirror neurons are found in the inferior frontal gyrus (region F5) and the inferior parietal lobule.[1]

Mirror neurons are believed to mediate the understanding of other animals' behaviour. For example, a mirror neuron which fires when the monkey rips a piece of paper would also fire when the monkey sees a person rip paper, or hears paper ripping (without visual cues). These properties have led researchers to believe that mirror neurons encode abstract concepts of actions like 'ripping paper', whether the action is performed by the monkey or another animal.[1]

The function of mirror neurons in macaques remains unknown. Adult macaques do not seem to learn by imitation. Recent experiments by Ferrari and colleagues suggest that infant macaques can imitate a human's face movements, though only as neonates and during a limited temporal window.[29] Even if it has not yet been empirically demonstrated, it has been proposed that mirror neurons underlie this behaviour and other imitative phenomena.[30] Indeed, there is limited understanding of the degree to which monkeys show imitative behaviour.[13]

In adult monkeys, mirror neurons may enable the monkey to understand what another monkey is doing, or to recognise the other monkey's action."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mirror_neuron

for more:

https://books.google.com/books?id=RBC2nY1rp5MC&pg=PA41&lpg=PA41&dq=military+propaganda+online&source=bl&ots=9D6eCZR9R8&sig=6KDTP_kZG9q6vUveN6KUwdW7pH0&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwisiYGzqPvPAhVK_4MKHaryCKUQ6AEIXjAM#v=onepage&q=military%20propaganda%20online&f=false

full movie: Hollywood & The Pentagon - A Dangerous Liaison https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c9kpUW5mwZ8 Somewhere in Texas, one of the most famous episodes of the Iraq war; the heroic rescue of U.S. Private Jessica Lynch was turned into a scene for a made-for-TV movie. The movie was broadcast on TV earlier this Fall, but not without sparking some controversy.