A Proper Gander At Propaganda

Truth Transcends Community

"Then a mighty strange thing happened.  Guess you could call it fate. You see, a gust of wind blew the picture frame down and it landed on the muckety-muck's head And the mice they all went crazy. For the first time they saw the lie.

It was all a hoax on just simple folks. And the muckety-muck must die. And die he did. The members of his staff they just fled. They were scared. Hah. Just not prepared." - Song: The Proper Gander. Songwriter: Bobby Darin

"Propaganda in the United States is spread by both government and media entities. Propaganda is information, ideas, or rumors deliberately spread widely to influence opinions. It's used in advertising, radio, newspaper, posters, books, television, and other media."  -  Propaganda in the United States - Wikipedia

"A man without a government is like a fish without a bicycle.” Alvaro Koplovich
Article index

Animals Make us Human: Observations of Cattle Behavior Applied to the Design of Cattle Handling Facilities & YOU!

Please excuse the stray typo.

A Mad Cow Disease Indeed: The "Everybody is Everything" Spectrum Maze Explored

As it turns out we can't escape the Big Pharma commissioned multimedia advertising and marketing (propaganda) "Blitz" of sloganeering and tabloid headlines proclaiming that everyone is on some magical rainbow personality disorder spectrum. The kernel of truth to be found hidden within this idea is effect the reality of our controlled society and contrived culture has on the individual. Yes most of us do suffer from a personality disorder, but no it is not related to the real condition known as autism. It has to do with the highly artificial and manipulative nature of civilization that many of us take for granted as normal. Too many of us live thinking things that are not true. In other words too may of us are technically "insane". It's so twisted and upside down that those of us who see through the lies and illusions are considered the ones who are "nuts', while the parroting masses of mindless zombies are considered the "norm". 

Aspergers Syndrome is a meme that the media noise machine has promoted for years and of course the multimedia machine has to produce iconic celebrities for the masses to emulate. We have to be shepherd and otherwise mentally herded into further engaging with the control system, in this case with the pharmaceutical and medical industry that puts profit above all else. 

Pied Piper of Hamelin - Wikipedia

Our entire lives from birth to death are all already part of the calculations. It's like the idea from the film the Matrix, where the machine state uses the natural human being as an energy source. This bit of allegory is all too true.

Take Proper Gander at Cowgirl Propaganda

The world needs all kinds of minds - Temple Grandin

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/admin/lessons Temple Grandin, diagnosed with autism as a child, talks about how her mind works -- sharing her ability to "think in pictures," which helps her solve problems that neurotypical brains might miss. She makes the case that the world needs people on the autism spectrum: visual thinkers, pattern thinkers, verbal thinkers, and all kinds of smart geeky kids.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pied_Piper_of_Hamelin

Great Orwell's Ghost & Huxley's Triple Spirits!

Autism Spectrums, Big Pharma Solutions, Leading The Stock To Slaughter & You:

We the People Are Cattle Too!

This woman is talking about me and you.

Please watch the TED talk. Of course Mary Temple Grandin claims people like Edison, Einstein and Nikola Tesla were on the autism spectrum. Here's the thing, people who go around going presentations, like Ms. Grandin, Bill Gates, Edison, Einstein, Tesla and all the rest, are not antisocial shy people at all. In fact people who seek the stage and the bright lights and all the ensuing media attention tend to be extroverted personalities and not introverted ones. It's unlikely Temple Grandin is what she claims. The public relations media machine is not to be trusted. The multimedia noise machine promotes the mass appeal t empty external authority over individual common sense and reason. "Everybody" always has "everything". Thinking in pictures does not mean you have a media promoted "disease" or disorder. It (basically) just means you have an inclination towards the visual arts. If we had never learned language we'd rely on visual thinking instead of "talking to ourselves, in our heads". By the way, the brain is "plastic" meaning your neural connections continue to grow. You can learn new behavior and you can correct what you don't like about your own behavior yourself. It takes effort but it can be done. You can learn to develop skills like visual thinking if you actually do put your mind to it.

Mary Temple Grandin

"In 1980 she published her first two scientific articles on beef cattle behavior during handling. The papers are titled Livestock Behavior as Related to Handling Facilities Design in the International Journal for the Study of Animal Problems, Vol. 1, pp. 33-52 and Observations of Cattle Behavior Applied to the Design of Cattle Handling Facilities, Applied Animal Ethology, Vol. 6, pp. 19-31. She was one of the first scientists to report that animals are sensitive to visual distractions in handling facilities such as shadows, dangling chains, and other environmental details most people do not notice. When she got her Ph.D. at the University of Illinois, she studied the effects of environmental enrichment on pigs. The title of her Dissertation was: Effect of Rearing Environment and environmental Enrichment on the Behavior and Neural Development in Young Pigs. Further information on these studies is in her book Animals Make us Human.

In 1993, she edited the first edition of Livestock Handling and Transport. She wrote three chapters and had chapters from contributors from around the world. Subsequent editions of the book were published in 2000, 2007, and 2014. In her academic work as a professor at Colorado State University, her graduate student Bridgett Voisinet conducted one of the early studies that showed that cattle that remained calm during handling had higher weight gains. In 1997, when the paper was published, this was a new concept. The paper is titled Feedlot Cattle with Calm Temperaments Have Higher Average Daily Gains Than Cattle with Excitable Temperaments and it was published in The Journal of Animal Science, Vol. 75, pp. 892-896.

Another important paper published by Grandin was Assessment of Stress During Handling and Transport, Journal of Animal Science, 1997, Vol. 75, pp. 249-257. This paper presented an idea that was new to the livestock industry. An animal’s previous experiences with handling could have an effect on how it will react to being handled in the future.

A major piece of equipment that Grandin developed was a center track (double rail) conveyor restrainer system for holding cattle during stunning in large beef plants. The first system was installed in the mid-eighties for calves and a system for large beef cattle was developed in 1990. This equipment is now being used by many large meat companies. It is described in: Grandin, T. (1988) Double Rail Restrainer Conveyor for Livestock Handling, Journal of Agricultural Engineering Research, Vol. 4, pp. 327-338 and Grandin, T. (2003) Transferring results of behavioral research to industry to improve animal welfare on the farm, ranch, and slaughter plant, Applied Animal Behavior Science, Vol. 8, pp. 215-228.

Grandin also developed an objective numerical scoring system for assessing animal welfare at slaughter plants. The use of this scoring system resulted in significant improvements in animal stunning and handling during slaughter. This work is described in three papers: Grandin, T. (1998) Objective scoring of animal handling and stunning practices in slaughter plants, Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 212, pp. 36-39, Grandin, T. (1998) The feasibility of using vocalization scoring as an indicator of poor welfare during slaughter, Applied Animal Behavior Science, Vol. 56, pp. 121-128, Grandin, T. (2000) Effect of animal welfare audits of slaughter plants by a major fast food company on cattle handling and stunning practices, Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Assoc., Vol. 216, pp. 848-851.

Grandin is the author or co-author of over 60 peer reviewed scientific papers on a variety of other animal behavior subjects. Some of the other subjects are: the effect of hair whorl position on cattle behavior, preslaughter stress and meat quality, religious slaughter, mothering behavior of beef cows, cattle temperament, and causes of bruising.

She has lectured widely about her first-hand experiences of the anxiety of feeling threatened by everything in her surroundings, and of being dismissed and feared, which allegedly motivates her work in humane livestock handling processes. She studied the behavior of cattle, how they react to ranchers, movements, objects, and light. Grandin then designed adapted curved corrals, intended to reduce stress, panic and injury in animals being led to slaughter. This has proved to be a further point of criticism and controversy among animal activists who have questioned the congruence of a career built on animal slaughter alongside Grandin's claims of compassion and respect for animals."

"Mary Temple Grandin (born August 29, 1947) is an American professor of animal science at Colorado State University, world-renowned autism spokesperson and consultant to the livestock industry on animal behavior. She is widely celebrated as one of the first individuals on the autism spectrum to publicly share insights from her personal experience of autism. She is also the inventor of the "hug box", a device to calm those on the autism spectrum. In the 2010 Time 100, an annual list of the 100 most influential people in the world, she was named in the "Heroes" category.[2] She was the subject of the award-winning, semi-biographical film, Temple Grandin."

"Temple Grandin was born in BostonMassachusetts, into a highly educated and wealthy family. Her parents were Anna Eustacia Purves (an actress, singer and granddaughter of the co-inventor for the autopilot aviation system (John Coleman Purves),[3] with a degree in English from Harvard University) and Richard Grandin,[4] a real estate agent and heir to the largest corporate wheat farm business in America at the time, Grandin Farms.[5] Grandin's parents subsequently divorced when she was 15 and her mother eventually went on to marry Ben Cutler, a renowned New York saxophonist, in 1965[6] (when Grandin was 18 years old). Grandin has three siblings - two sisters and a brother, with Grandin being the oldest. Grandin has described one of her sisters as being dyslexic. Her other sister is a sculptor and her brother a banker.[5] John Livingston Grandin and his brother William James Grandin (Temple's paternal great grandfather), were French Huguenots who drilled for oil, intended to cut a deal with John D Rockefeller but the latter kept him waiting too long so he walked out before Rockefeller arrived. Then they went into banking and when Jay Cooke's firm collapsed they got thousands of acres of undeveloped land in North Dakota as collateral. They set up wheat farming in the Red River Valley there with dormitories for the workers and the town of Grandin is named after John Livingston Grandin.[7][8]

Diagnosis[edit]

Contrary to widely published reports, Grandin was never formally diagnosed with autism in childhood or in youth. The only formal diagnosis received by Grandin was of 'brain damage' at the age of 2,[9][10] a finding corroborated subsequently when she was 64 years old, by cerebral imaging carried out in 2010 at the University of Utah.[11] When Grandin was in her mid-teens, her mother chanced upon a checklist on autism published by Dr. Bernard Rimland, a renowned American psychologist and founder of the Autism Research Institute. Completing the checklist, Grandin's mother hypothesised that Grandin's symptoms were best explained by autism.[9] A formal diagnosis consistent with being on the autism spectrum was made only when Grandin was in her 40s."

"Higher education[edit]

After she graduated in 1966 from Mountain Country School, Grandin went on to earn her bachelor's degree in human psychology from Franklin Pierce College in 1970, a master's degree in animal science from Arizona State University in 1975, and a doctoral degree in animal science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1989.

Grandin is a prominent and widely cited proponent for the humane treatment of livestock for slaughter. She is also internationally famous as a spokesperson on autism.[19]

Steve Silberman in his book Neuro Tribes wrote that Temple Grandin helped break down years of shame and stigma because she was one of the first adults to publicly disclose that she was autistic. Bernard Rimland, a father of a son with autism and author of the book Infantile Autism, wrote the foreword to Grandin’s first book Emergence Labeled Autistic. The book was published in 1986. Dr. Rimland wrote “Temple’s ability to convey to the reader her innermost feelings and fears, coupled with her capacity for explaining mental processes will give the reader an insight into autism that very few have been able to achieve.”

In her later book Thinking in Pictures, published in 1995, the neurologist Oliver Sacks wrote at the end of the forward that the book provided “a bridge between our world and hers, and allows us to glimpse into a quite other sort of mind.”

In her early writings, Grandin made the mistake of presenting herself as a recovered autistic and in his foreword Bernard Rimland used the term recovered autistic individual.” In her later writings, this has been removed. Steve Silberman wrote, “It became obvious to her, however, that she was not recovered but had learned with great effort to adapt to the social norms of the people around her.”

Cattle Lost in Temple's Maze

"When her book Thinking in Pictures was written in 1995, Grandin thought that all individuals with autism thought in photographic specific images the way she did. When the expanded edition was published in 2006, she now realized that it had been wrong to assume that every person with autism processed information the same way she did. In this edition, she wrote that there were three types of specialized thinking. They were: 1. Visual Thinkers like her who think in photographically specific images. 2. Music and Math Thinkers – these people think in patterns and may be good at mathematics, chess, and programming computers. 3. Verbal Logic Thinkers – These people think in word details and their favorite subject may be history.

In one of her newer books, The Autistic Brain: Thinking Across the Spectrum, the concept of three different types of thinking in autism is further developed. This book was published in 2013. An influential book which helped her develop her concept of pattern thinking was Clara Claiborne Park’s book titled Exiting Nirvana: A Daughter’s Life with Autism. It was published in 2001. The Autistic Brain also contains an extensive review of scientific studies that provide evidence that of object visual thinking is different from spatial visualization abilities.

In 1980 she published her first two scientific articles on beef cattle behavior during handling. The papers are titled Livestock Behavior as Related to Handling Facilities Design in the International Journal for the Study of Animal Problems, Vol. 1, pp. 33-52 and Observations of Cattle Behavior Applied to the Design of Cattle Handling Facilities, Applied Animal Ethology, Vol. 6, pp. 19-31. She was one of the first scientists to report that animals are sensitive to visual distractions in handling facilities such as shadows, dangling chains, and other environmental details most people do not notice. When she got her Ph.D. at the University of Illinois, she studied the effects of environmental enrichment on pigs. The title of her Dissertation was: Effect of Rearing Environment and environmental Enrichment on the Behavior and Neural Development in Young Pigs. Further information on these studies is in her book Animals Make us Human."

"Temple Grandin was born in BostonMassachusetts, into a highly educated and wealthy family. Her parents were Anna Eustacia Purves (an actress, singer and granddaughter of the co-inventor for the autopilot aviation system (John Coleman Purves),[3] with a degree in English from Harvard University) and Richard Grandin,[4] a real estate agent and heir to the largest corporate wheat farm business in America at the time, Grandin Farms.[5] Grandin's parents subsequently divorced when she was 15 and her mother eventually went on to marry Ben Cutler, a renowned New York saxophonist, in 1965[6] (when Grandin was 18 years old). Grandin has three siblings - two sisters and a brother, with Grandin being the oldest. Grandin has described one of her sisters as being dyslexic. Her other sister is a sculptor and her brother a banker.[5] John Livingston Grandin and his brother William James Grandin (Temple's paternal great grandfather), were French Huguenots who drilled for oil, intended to cut a deal with John D Rockefeller but the latter kept him waiting too long so he walked out before Rockefeller arrived. Then they went into banking and when Jay Cooke's firm collapsed they got thousands of acres of undeveloped land in North Dakota as collateral. They set up wheat farming in the Red River Valley there with dormitories for the workers and the town of Grandin is named after John Livingston Grandin."

"After she graduated in 1966 from Mountain Country School, Grandin went on to earn her bachelor's degree in human psychology from Franklin Pierce College in 1970, a master's degree in animal science from Arizona State University in 1975, and a doctoral degree in animal science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1989."

Temple Grandin - Wikipedia

Cattle Lost in Temple's Maze

Great Shades of The Minotaur's Maze!

"Pasiphaë, wife of King Minos of Crete, had several children before the Minotaur. The eldest of these, Androgeos, set sail for Athens to take part in the Panathenaic Games, which were held there every four years. Being strong and skillful, he did very well, winning some events outright. He soon became a crowd favorite, much to the resentment of the Pallantides, and they assassinated him, incurring the wrath of Minos.

When King Minos had heard of what befell his son, he ordered the Cretan fleet to set sail for Athens. Minos asked Aegeus for his son's assassins, and if they were to be handed to him, the town would be spared. However, not knowing who the assassins were, King Aegeus surrendered the whole town to Minos' mercy. His retribution was that, at the end of every Great Year (seven solar years), the seven most courageous youths and the seven most beautiful maidens were to board a boat and be sent as tribute to Crete, never to be seen again.

In another version, King Minos had waged war with the Athenians and was successful. He then demanded that, at nine-year intervals, seven Athenian boys and seven Athenian girls were to be sent to Crete to be devoured by the Minotaur, a half-man, half-bull monster that lived in the Labyrinth created by Daedalus.

On the third occasion, Theseus volunteered to slay the monster to stop this horror. He took the place of one of the youths and set off with a black sail, promising to his father, Aegeus, that if successful he would return with a white sail.[10] Like the others, Theseus was stripped of his weapons when they sailed. On his arrival in Crete, Ariadne, King Minos' daughter, fell in love with Theseus and, on the advice of Daedalus, gave him a ball of thread (a clew), so he could find his way out of the Labyrinth.[11]That night, Ariadne escorted Theseus to the Labyrinth, and Theseus promised that if he returned from the Labyrinth he would take Ariadne with him. As soon as Theseus entered the Labyrinth, he tied one end of the ball of string to the door post and brandished his sword which he had kept hidden from the guards inside his tunic. Theseus followed Daedalus' instructions given to Ariadne; go forwards, always down and never left or right. Theseus came to the heart of the Labyrinth and also upon the sleeping Minotaur. The beast awoke and a tremendous fight then occurred. Theseus overpowered the Minotaur with his strength and stabbed the beast in the throat with his sword (according to one scholium on Pindar's Fifth Nemean Ode, Theseus strangled it).[12]

After decapitating the beast, Theseus used the string to escape the Labyrinth and managed to escape with all of the young Athenians and Ariadne as well as her younger sister Phaedra. Then he and the rest of the crew fell asleep on the beach. Athena woke Theseus and told him to leave early that morning. Athena told Theseus to leave Ariadne and Phaedra on the beach. Stricken with distress, Theseus forgot to put up the white sails instead of the black ones, so the king committed suicide, in some versions throwing himself off a cliff and into the sea, thus causing this body of water to be named the Aegean. Dionysus later saw Ariadne crying out for Theseus and took pity on her and married her."

fa57b50760984175df018ef9791258b9.jpg

"Obey" Seems to have originated with Jack Kirby's "Mr. Miracle" DC Comics work from the 1970's.

Can We Get Out of This Amazing, Childish & Cartoonish. Historical Mythological Maze, "Scott Free"?

Mister Miracle - Wikipedia

Human Beings Are Not Persons or Corporations

Wizards - 1977 full film Youtube - an interesting allegory about the power of Hollywood magic over human imagination.

Alan Watts Escaping The Trap

Alan Watts - deep down, everyone knows authority is a joke...

Alan Wilson Watts (6 January 1915 - 16 November 1973) was a British-born philosopher, writer, and speaker, best known as an interpreter and populariser of Eastern philosophy for a Western audience. Born in Chislehurst, England, he moved to the United States in 1938 and began Zen training in New York.