A Proper Gander At Propaganda

Truth Transcends Community

"Then a mighty strange thing happened.  Guess you could call it fate. You see, a gust of wind blew the picture frame down and it landed on the muckety-muck's head And the mice they all went crazy. For the first time they saw the lie.

It was all a hoax on just simple folks. And the muckety-muck must die. And die he did. The members of his staff they just fled. They were scared. Hah. Just not prepared." - Song: The Proper Gander. Songwriter: Bobby Darin

"Propaganda in the United States is spread by both government and media entities. Propaganda is information, ideas, or rumors deliberately spread widely to influence opinions. It's used in advertising, radio, newspaper, posters, books, television, and other media."  -  Propaganda in the United States - Wikipedia

"A man without a government is like a fish without a bicycle.” Alvaro Koplovich
Article index

Authoring Authority: Mastering The Magic Spells That Bind Human Minds

A

A - B - R 

A - B - R - A 

A - B - R - A - C 

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A - B - R - A - C - A - D

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How Do You Spell... Slave?

Many of us really enjoy magic.

We like being fooled with stage magic and many of us enjoy myths, fairy tales and fantasy fiction.

Some of us like entertaining the idea that we can become the legendary witches and wizards and deal with demons and cast spells ourselves. Most think this absurd.

The fact is there is something to the magic of "spelling".

The crafting of language ends up defining the bounds of reason for the mass public.

We tend to overlook the origins of the words we use.

Do Not Confuse Symbols With Reality or The Model With The Real Phenomena

Alan Watts - why not now??

Uploaded by Glenn Frosty on 2014-12-20.

The Land of The Free is A Lie

Laws and constitutions, treaties and contracts bind our artificial world. Most of us take the external authority of the many layers of governmental control for granted more often than not. The thing about authority is, it really is all "made up". All anyone can do, expert or not, is tell you what they think and why. The authority should be able to point you to the source of their opinions so you can check it out for yourself. Ours is a culture founded on the shepherding of the mass human resource and not really on the idea that the mass of humanity really needs to be 'enlightened'.

The so-called authority of government relies on our assumed consent and we go along with it. We really need to start resisting this very real feudal system. We have been conditioned to accept all sorts of fees, fines and jail time that we should not accept. Personal behavior choices should not result in possible jail time, or a fine and arrest record. We should not have to stand trial over personal behavior choices. What adults do with their own bodies is their business. Freedom is our natural state and is not a right that can  granted by external authority. Constitutions and Bills of Rights are designed to restrict freedom not grant it. Constitutions and Bills of Rights are meant to define the powers of Government not you, but by the somewhat clever use of words and "magic" spelling, by twisting reason and using circular based logic, magically, government can do whatever it wants and it's various hydra heads can define down as up and left as right and back again, as often and whenever they all like.

The real crime and sin is when one forces one's will onto others. Adults are not children who need external guidance and guardianship and yet we are treated as such. Fear and divisive propaganda is usually heavily promoted by the governments and news and related media in order to keep us all really believing we need all the layers of external authority we do not need. We are to remain wage slaves in a very real feudal system most of us do not see.

Politicians are famously known for telling lies and it seems to be part of the job, In fact if we take the idea of security clearances seriously, governmental employees and elected officials have to lie to the public. They swear oaths to uphold the constitutions of the governments they go to work for, they do not swear oaths to defend and protect you. They are obligated to defend and protect the government. Basically you are a human resource to be exploited by the system.

Propaganda is an example of "Magical Spell Crafting". The various multimedia products also work their "Magic" on the imagination  and illusions take on the air of reality. Plato's magic cave is projected on screens "everywhere" in today's world. Political spin and advertising make liberal use of "magical spellbinding" techniques to sell ideas and products to the mass public. The manipulation of human psychology might seem magical, but it is just science.

Spin (propaganda) - Wikipedia

Plato's Allegory of the Cave - Wikipedia

Monkey see, monkey do - Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domesday_Book

All The World's a Scripted Theatrical Stage

authority (n.) 

"c. 1200, autoriteauctorite "authoritative passage or statement, book or quotation that settles an argument, passage from Scripture," from Old French autoritéauctorité "authority, prestige, right, permission, dignity, gravity; the Scriptures" (12c.; Modern French autorité), from Latin auctoritatem (nominative auctoritas) "invention, advice, opinion, influence, command," from auctor "master, leader, author" (see author (n.)). Usually spelled with a -c- in English before 16c., when the letter was dropped in imitation of French. 

From c. 1300 in the general sense "legal validity," also "authoritative book; authoritative doctrine" (opposed to reason or experience); "author whose statements are regarded as correct." From mid-14c. as "right to rule or command, power to enforce obedience." In Middle English also "value, good reputation; power to convince people, capacity for inspiring trust." From c. 1400 as "official sanction, authorization." Meaning "people in authority" is from 1610s; Authorities "those in charge, those with police powers" is recorded from mid-19c."

Authority - Online Etymology Dictionary

licence (n.) 

late 14c., "formal authorization, official permission, permit, privilege," from Old French licence "freedom, liberty, power, possibility; permission," (12c.), from Latin licentia "freedom, liberty; unrestrained liberty, wantonness, presumption," from licentem (nominative licens), present participle of licere "to be allowed, be lawful," from PIE root *leik- "to offer, bargain, make a bid" (possibly source also of Lettish likstu "I come to terms"). 

Meaning "formal (usually written) permission from authority to do something" (marry, hunt, drive, etc.) is first attested early 15c. Meaning "excessive liberty, disregard of propriety" in English is from mid-15c. In Middle English spelled licencelicenslisencelissenslicance. There have been attempts to confine license to verbal use and licence to noun use (compare advise/advicedevise/device, and see note in OED). 

Poetic license "intentional deviation from recognized form or rule" is from 1733, earlier as lycence poetycall (1530). The licence-plate is from 1870 (of dogs and wagons before automobiles); licence-number is by 1903.

licence - Online Etymology Dictionary

constitution (n.) 

mid-14c., "law, regulation, edict," from Old French constitucion (12c.) "constitution, establishment," and directly from Latin constitutionem (nominative constitutio) "act of settling, settled condition, anything arranged or settled upon, regulation, order, ordinance," from constitut-, past participle stem of constituere (see constitute). 

Meaning "action of establishing" is from 1580s; that of "way in which a thing is constituted" is from c. 1600; that of "physical health, strength and vigor of the body" is from 1550s; of the mind, "temperament, character" from 1580s. Sense of "mode of organization of a state" is from c. 1600; that of "system of principles by which a community is governed" dates from 1730s; especially of a document of written laws since the U.S. and French constitutions, late 18c.

constitutional (adj.) 

1680s, "pertaining to a person's (physical or mental) constitution," from constitution + -al (1). Meaning "beneficial to bodily constitution" is from 1750. Meaning "authorized or allowed by the political constitution" is from 1765. Constitutional monarchy is recorded from 1801, from French. Related: Constitutionally.

constitutionality (n.) 

1787, "quality of being in accord with a constitution," from constitutional (adj.) + -ity.

constitutionalism (n.) 

1832, "constitutional system of government;" occasionally also "constitutionality;" from constitutional (adj.) + -ism.

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=constitution

author (n.) 

"mid-14c., auctorautourautor "father, creator, one who brings about, one who makes or creates" someone or something, from Old French auctoracteor "author, originator, creator, instigator" (12c., Modern French auteur) and directly from Latin auctor "enlarger, founder, master, leader," literally "one who causes to grow," agent noun from auctus, past participle of augere "to increase" (see augment). 

From late 14c. as "a writer, one who sets forth written statements." Also from late 14c. as "source of authoritative information or opinion," now archaic but the sense behind authority, etc. In Middle English sometimes confused with actor. The -t- changed to -th-16c. on mistaken assumption of Greek origin.

...[W]riting means revealing onesself to excess .... This is why one can never be alone enough when one writes, why even night is not night enough. ... I have often thought that the best mode of life for me would be to sit in the innermost room of a spacious locked cellar with my writing things and a lamp. Food would be brought and always put down far away from my room, outside the cellar's outermost door. The walk to my food, in my dressing gown, through the vaulted cellars, would be my only exercise. I would then return to my table, eat slowly and with deliberation, then start writing again at once. And how I would write! From what depths I would drag it up! [Franz Kafka]

author (v.) 

1590s, from author (n.). Revived 1940s, chiefly U.S. Related: Authoredauthoring."

Author - Online Etymology Dictionary

actor (n.) 

late 14c., "an overseer, guardian, steward," from Latin actor "an agent or doer; a driver (of sheep, etc.)," in law, "accuser, plaintiff," also "theatrical player, orator," from past participle stem of agere "to set in motion, drive, drive forward," hence "to do, perform," also "act on stage, play the part of; plead a cause at law" (see act (n.)). In English from mid-15c. as "a doer, maker," also "a plaintiff at law." Sense of "one who performs in plays" is 1580s, originally applied to both men and women. Related: Actorishactorlyactory.

actor (n.) - Online Etymology Dictionary

agent (n.) 

late 15c., "one who acts," from Latin agentem (nominative agens) "effective, powerful," present participle of agere "to set in motion, drive forward; to do, perform; keep in movement" (see act (n.)). Meaning "any natural force or substance which produces a phenomenon" is from 1550s. Meaning "deputy, representative" is from 1590s. Sense of "spy, secret agent" is attested by 1916.

Agent - Online Etymology Dictionary

artist (n.) 

1580s, "one who cultivates one of the fine arts," from Middle French artiste (14c.), from Italian artista, from Medieval Latin artista, from Latin ars (see art (n.)). 

Originally used especially of the arts presided over by the Muses (history, poetry, comedy, tragedy, music, dancing, astronomy), but also used 17c. for "one skilled in any art or craft" (including professors, surgeons, craftsmen, cooks). Now especially of "one who practices the arts of design or visual arts" (a sense first attested 1747).

artist - Online Etymology Dictionary

music (n.) 

mid-13c., musike, from Old French musique (12c.) and directly from Latin musica "the art of music," also including poetry (also source of Spanish musica, Italian musica, Old High German mosica, German Musik, Dutch muziek, Danish musik), from Greek mousike (techne)"(art) of the Muses," from fem. of mousikos "pertaining to the Muses," from Mousa "Muse" (see muse (n.)). Modern spelling from 1630s. In classical Greece, any art in which the Muses presided, but especially music and lyric poetry

The use of letters to denote music pitch probably is at least as old as ancient Greece, as their numbering system was ill-suited to the job. Natural scales begin at C (not A) because in ancient times the minor mode was more often used than the major one, and the natural minor scale begins at A. 

Music box is from 1773, originally "barrel organ;" music hall is from 1842, especially "hall licensed for musical entertainment" (1857). To face the music "accept the consequences" is from 1850; the exact image is uncertain, one theory ties it to stage performers, another to cavalry horses having to be taught to stay calm while the regimental band plays. To make (beautiful) music with someone "have sexual intercourse" is from 1967.

Music - Online Etymology Dictionary

muse (v.) 

"to reflect, to be absorbed in thought," mid-14c., from Old French muser (12c.) "to ponder, dream, wonder; loiter, waste time," literally "to stand with one's nose in the air" (or, possibly, "to sniff about" like a dog who has lost the scent), from muse "muzzle," from Gallo-Roman *musa "snout," of unknown origin. Probably influenced in sense by muse (n.). Related: Musedmusing.

muse (n.) 

late 14c., protectors of the arts, from Old French Muse and directly from Latin Musa, from Greek Mousa, "the Muse," also "music, song," from PIE root *men- (1) "to think, remember" (see mind (n.)). Meaning "inspiring goddess of a particular poet" is from late 14c. 

The traditional names and specialties of the nine Muses, daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne, are: Calliope (epic poetry), Clio (history), Erato (love poetry, lyric art), Euterpe (music, especially flute), Melpomene (tragedy), Polymnia (hymns), Terpsichore (dance), Thalia(comedy), Urania (astronomy).

museum (n.) 

1610s, "the university building in Alexandria," from Latin museum "library, study," from Greek mouseion "place of study, library or museum, school of art or poetry," originally "a seat or shrine of the Muses," from Mousa "Muse" (see muse (n.)). Earliest use in reference to English institutions was of libraries (such as the British Museum); sense of "building to display objects" first recorded 1680s.

musing (n.) 

late 14c., "complaint," verbal noun from muse (v.). Meaning "pondering" is from mid-15c. Related: Musinglymusings.

bemuse (v.) 

"to make utterly confused," from be- + muse (compare amuse); attested from 1735 but probably older, as Pope (1705) punned on it as "devoted utterly to the Muses."

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php

enlightenment (n.)

ABRACADABRA!

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

"This article is about an incantational word. For other uses, see Abracadabra (disambiguation).

Abracadabra is an incantation used as a magic word in stage magic tricks, and historically was believed to have healing powers when inscribed on an amulet.

The word may have its origin in the Aramaic language, but numerous conflicting folk etymologies are associated with it.

The word Abracadabra may derive from an Aramaic phrase meaning "I create as I speak."[1] This etymology is dubious, however, as אברא כדברא in Aramaic is more reasonably translated "I create like the word." In the Hebrew language, the phrase translates more accurately as "it came to pass as it was spoken."[2]

"[A]bracadabra may comprise the abbreviated forms of the Hebrew words Av (Father), Ben (Son) and Ruach Ha Codesch (Holy Spirit), though an alternative derivation relates the word to Abraxas, a god with snakes for feet who was worshiped in Alexandria."[3] David Pickering's description of the word as an abbreviation from Hebrew is also a false etymology—as he apparently here means Aramaic (בר is Aramaic for "son", it is בן in Hebrew, although בר is an honorific form), nor does he account for the final five letters (i.e., -dabra) in the lexeme.

The word may have its origin in the Aramaic language, but numerous conflicting folk etymologies are associated with it.

The word Abracadabra may derive from an Aramaic phrase meaning "I create as I speak."[1] This etymology is dubious, however, as אברא כדברא in Aramaic is more reasonably translated "I create like the word." In the Hebrew language, the phrase translates more accurately as "it came to pass as it was spoken."[2]

"[A]bracadabra may comprise the abbreviated forms of the Hebrew words Av (Father), Ben (Son) and Ruach Ha Codesch (Holy Spirit), though an alternative derivation relates the word to Abraxas, a god with snakes for feet who was worshiped in Alexandria."[3] David Pickering's description of the word as an abbreviation from Hebrew is also a false etymology—as he apparently here means Aramaic (בר is Aramaic for "son", it is בן in Hebrew, although בר is an honorific form), nor does he account for the final five letters (i.e., -dabra) in the lexeme.

History 

The first known mention of the word was in the third century AD in a book called Liber Medicinalis (sometimes known as De Medicina Praecepta Saluberrima) by Quintus Serenus Sammonicus,[4] physician to the Roman emperor Caracalla, who in chapter 51 prescribed that malaria[5] sufferers wear an amulet containing the word written in the form of a triangle:[6]

A - B - R - A - C - A - D - A - B - R - A
A - B - R - A - C - A - D - A - B - R
A - B - R - A - C - A - D - A - B
A - B - R - A - C - A - D - A
A - B - R - A - C - A - D
A - B - R - A - C - A
A - B - R - A - C
A - B - R - A
A - B - R
A - B

A

A - B

A - B - R 

A - B - R - A 

A - B - R - A - C 

A - B - R - A - C - A

A - B - R - A - C - A - D

A - B - R - A - C - A - D - A

A - B - R - A - C - A - D - A - B

A - B - R - A - C - A - D - A - B - R

A - B - R - A - C - A - D - A - B - R - A

Open Sesame

""Open Sesame" (Arabicافتح يا سمسم‎‎ iftaḥ yā simsimFrenchSésame, ouvre-toi) is a magical phrase in the story of "Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves" in One Thousand and One Nights. It opens the mouth of a cave in which forty thieves have hidden a treasure."

"The phrase first appears in writing in Antoine Galland's Les Mille et une nuits (1704–1717) as Sésame, ouvre-toi (English, "Sesame, open!").[1] No earlier oral or written version of the story is known in any language.

Galland's phrase has been variously translated from the French into English as "Sesame, Open",[2] "Open, Sesame" and

"Open, O Simsim"

A - B - R - A - C - A - D - A - B - R - A
A - B - R - A - C - A - D - A - B - R
A - B - R - A - C - A - D - A - B
A - B - R - A - C - A - D - A
A - B - R - A - C - A - D
A - B - R - A - C - A
A - B - R - A - C
A - B - R - A
A - B - R
A - B
A

Abrahadabra

 

S A T O R

A R E P O

T E N E T

O P E R A

R O T A S

Sator Square

"Sator 

(from serere=to sow) Sower, planter; founder, progenitor (usually divine); originator

Arepo 

unknown, likely a proper name, either invented or, perhaps, of Egyptian origin

Tenet 

(from tenere=to hold) holds, keeps; comprehends; possesses; masters; preserves

Opera 

(noun) work, care; aid, service, effort/trouble; (from opus): works, deeds.

Rotas 

(from noun rota) wheels

"One likely translation is "The farmer Arepo has [as] works wheels [a plough]"; that is, the farmer uses his plough as his form of work. Although not a significant sentence, it is grammatical; it can be read up and down, backwards and forwards. C. W. Ceram also reads the square boustrophedon (in alternating directions). But since word order is very free in Latin, the translation is the same. If the Sator Square is read boustrophedon, with a reverse in direction, then the words become SATOR OPERA TENET, with the sequence reversed.[1]

The word arepo is a hapax legomenon, appearing nowhere else in Latin literature. Its similarity with arrepo, from ad repo, 'I creep towards', may be coincidental. Most of those who have studied the Sator Square agree that it is a proper name, either an adaptation of a non-Latin word or most likely a name invented specifically for this sentence. Jerome Carcopino thought that it came from a Celtic, specifically Gaulish, word for ploughDavid Daube argued that it represented a Hebrew or Aramaic rendition of the Greek Αλφα ω, or "Alpha-Omega" (cf. Revelation 1:8) by early Christians. J. Gwyn Griffiths contended that it came, via Alexandria, from the attested Egyptian name Ḥr-Ḥp, which he took to mean "the face of Apis".[2] An origin in Graeco-Roman Egypt was also advocated by Miroslav Marcovich, who maintains that Arepo is a Latinized abbreviation of Harpocrates, god of the rising sun, in some places called Γεωργός `Aρπον, which Marcovich suggests corresponds to Sator Arepo.[3]"

Imagined Magi Become Modern Stage Magicians & Modern Hollywood Special Effects Wizards

"In Cappadocia, in the time of Constantine VIIPorphyrogenitus (913-959), the shepherds of the Nativity story are called SATOR, AREPON, and TENETON, while a Byzantine bible of an earlier period conjures out of the square the baptismal names of the three Magi, ATOR, SATOR, and PERATORAS.

If "arepo" is taken to be in the second declension, the "-o" ending could put the word in the ablative case, giving it a meaning of "by means of [arepus]." Using this definition of "arepo" and the boustrophedon reading order produces the text "The sower works for mastery by turning the wheel.""

"The power of the amulet, he explained, makes lethal diseases go away. Other Roman emperors, including Geta and Alexander Severus, were followers of the medical teachings of Serenus Sammonicus and may have used the incantation as well.[4]

It was used as a magical formula by the Gnostics of the sect of Basilides in invoking the aid of beneficent spirits against disease and misfortune.[7] It is found on Abraxas stones, which were worn as amulets. Subsequently, its use spread beyond the Gnostics.

The Puritan minister Increase Mather dismissed the word as bereft of power. Daniel Defoe also wrote dismissively about Londoners who posted the word on their doorways to ward off sickness during the Great Plague of London.[8] But Aleister Crowley regarded it as possessing great power; he said its true form is abrahadabra.[9]

The word is now commonly used as an incantation by stage magicians when performing a magic trick. It is also applied contemptuously to a conception or hypothesis purporting to be a simple solution of apparently insoluble phenomena."

Abracadabra - Wikipedia

"A barbarous name is a meaningless or seemingly meaningless word used in magic rituals. The term barbarous comes from the Greek barbaroi (Greek: βάρβαροι) meaning those who do not follow Greek customs (barbarians). Often these names were derived from foreign sources and acquired their "barbarous" nature from the magician's lack of understanding of that language.[1][2]

Many ancient barbarous names were of Egyptian origin,[1][2] though there were plenty of Hebrew and Persian names that were corrupted by transcription into Greek.[1] They appear throughout the Greek Magical Papyri,[1][2] a notable example being "ablanathanalba."[1]

Iamblichus discusses barbarous names, warning magicians not to translate them even if their original meaning is discovered, due to the belief that the power of the names resided in their sound, not their meaning.[1] The term also appears in the Chaldean Oracles.[3][4]

By the medieval period most were from Greek and Hebrew sources, such as "anexhexeton."[1] Gemistus Pletho censored references to barbarous names (as well as Christianity) in Michael Psellos's copy of the Chaldean Oracles.[4]

The Enochian language of John Dee and Edward Kelley introduced a variety of barbarous names to modern magical practice.[1][2]

In the modern era, Aleister Crowley, like Iamblichus before him, argued that the supposed effectiveness of barbarous names rested in their utterance, not their meaning."

Barbarous names

A

A - B

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A - B - R - A 

A - B - R - A - C 

A - B - R - A - C - A

A - B - R - A - C - A - D

A - B - R - A - C - A - D - A

A - B - R - A - C - A - D - A - B

A - B - R - A - C - A - D - A - B - R

A - B - R - A - C - A - D - A - B - R - A

Presto

Hocus pocus

A - B - R - A - H - A - D - A - B - R - A
A - B - R - A - H - A - D - A - B - R
A - B - R - A - H - A - D - A - B
A - B - R - A - H - A - D - A
A - B - R - A - H - A - D
A - B - R - A - H - A
A - B - R - A - H
A - B - R - A
A - B
- R
A - B
A