A Proper Gander At Propaganda

TRUTH TRANSCENDS COMMUNITY

PLEASE NOTE: This is not a conspiracy theory blog.

This website exists to serve as public resource for reverse imagineering world-wide culture, one that takes a critical look at the numerous artifacts and other types of relics that represent our shared collective international heritage. This blog is dedicated to examining social engineering and the use of tax funded governmental propaganda, and the mainstream media, as international human resource management tools.

About The AA Morris Proper Gander At Propaganda Podcast: Coming to you from one of the suburban metropolitan melting pots of international culture, outside of one of the multimedia capitals of the world, New York City, the Proper Gander at Propaganda podcast is meant to be a filter free look at our shared international cultural heritage, our shared social media infused and obsessed present, and what our children and their children could be looking forward to. This link will bring you to the podcast page of this website, with embedded squarespace audio: link: http://www.aamorris.net/podcast/

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AA "The Proper Gander" Morris

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Early Special Effects Case Study: L'Inferno 1911

1911: L'Inferno

L'Inferno (1911) - FULL MOVIE

"The film's depictions of Hell closely followed those in the engravings of Gustave Doré for an edition of The Divine Comedy, which were familiar to an international audience, and employed several special effects."

"L'Inferno is a 1911 Italian silent film, loosely adapted from Dante Alighieri's The Divine Comedy. L'Inferno took over three years to make, and was the first full-length Italian feature film ever made. (The Story of the Kelly Gang, released in Australia in 1906, is the first full-length film).

L'Inferno was first screened in Naples in the Teatro Mercadante on March 10, 1911. An international success, it took in more than $2 million in the United States alone, where its length gave theater owners an excuse for raising ticket prices.[3] For this reason, L'Inferno was arguably the first true blockbuster in all of cinema."

L'Inferno - Wikipedia