A Proper Gander At Propaganda

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"Propaganda in the United States is spread by both government and media entities. Propaganda is information, ideas, or rumors deliberately spread widely to influence opinions. It's used in advertising, radio, newspaper, posters, books, television, and other media."  -  Propaganda in the United States - Wikipedia

"A man without a government is like a fish without a bicycle.” Alvaro Koplovich

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Simulation Meets Hollywood: Hyper Realistic™ Strategic Operations

How the U.S. Army Uses 3D Battlefield Simulations for Training

Stimulating neural networks with war simulation in the digital age of immersive video game reality fakery is modern indoctrinating military grade propaganda.

How the U.S. Army Uses 3D Battlefield Simulations for Training

Acting in an Artificial Afghanistan:

"An hour northeast of Barstow, California, there's an army base the size of Rhode Island, complete with a fake Afghan town known as Ertebat Shar."

"Fort Irwin is a U.S. army base nearly the size of Rhode Island, located in the Mojave Desert about an hour's drive northeast of Barstow, California. There you will find the National Training Center, or NTC, at which all U.S. troops, from all the services, spend a twenty-one day rotation before they deploy overseas."

Living In a World Of Hollywood Virtual Reality: Fake Space Programs & Theaters of War

"With pride, Ferrell noted that Fort Irwin is the only place where the U.S. military can train using all of the systems it will later use in theater. The base's 1,000 square miles of desert is large enough to allow what Ferrell called "great maneuverability"; its airspace is restricted; and its truly remote location ensures an uncluttered electromagnetic spectrum, meaning that troops can practice both collection and jamming. These latter techniques even include interfering with GPS, providing they warn the Federal Aviation Administration in advance."

It's Artificial Afghanistan: A Simulated Battlefield in the Mojave Desert ...

Lights, Action: War Theatre

"Oddly, it's worth noting that Fort Irwin also houses the electromagnetically sensitive Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex, part of NASA's global Deep Space Network. As science writer Oliver Morton explains in a paper called "Moonshine and Glue: A Thirteen-Unit Guide to the Extreme Edge of Astrophysics" (PDF), "when digitized battalions slug it out with all the tools of modern warfare, radio, radar, and electronic warfare emissions fly as freely around Fort Irwin as bullets in a battle. For people listening to signals from distant spacecraft on pre-arranged frequency bands, this noise is not too much of a problem." However, he adds, for other, far more sensitive experiments, "radio interference from the military next door is its biggest headache."  "

It's Artificial Afghanistan: A Simulated Battlefield in the Mojave Desert ...

Role Players Wanted For Fear Based Campaign!

LOOKING TO THE FUTURE

"Building on training support experience from OEF, OIF, and Overseas Contingency Operations… Strategic Operations, Inc. (STOPS) offers innovative solutions for the challenges our war-fighters face in this increasingly unstable world. Future threats to our nation’s security more and more will come from failed states and under-governed areas where instability, chaos, and human misery foster breeding grounds for terrorism and insurgencies. Terrorism will not be so much the cause of our future problems as it will be the result of our failures to understand the human domain. As our military becomes more agile, flexible, and ready for the challenges ahead, so must our understanding of the physical, cultural, and social environments in strategic parts of the globe. Our training must be based on these understandings. STOPS creates Hyper-Realistic™ training environments and simulations based on human terrain analytics, an understanding of human geography, and the social and cultural awareness that can help our military and civilian counterparts shape the human terrain before instability morphs into threats. "

Strategic Operations | Hyper-Realistic™ Military and Medical Training

Military FPS Video Game Simulations: Team War Practice by V*I*C*E

Military FPS Video Game Simulations: Team War Practice by V*I*C*E

Military Simulation Jobs in Hollywood, FL - Hollywood Military ...

Simulation Meets Hollywood: Integrating Graphics, Sound, Story and ...

Military simulation - Wikipedia

Theatrical Roles That Need Filling: The Art of Gaming The Long Con

"In 16th century Europe, traveling teams of players performed a form of improvisational theatre known as the Commedia dell'arte, with stock situations, stock characters and improvised dialogue. In the 19th and early 20th century, many board games and parlour games such as the game Jury Box included elements of role-playing. Mock trials, model legislatures, and the "Theatre Games" created by Viola Spolin arose, in which players took on the roles of characters and improvised, but without the formalised rules which would characterise modern role-playing games."

"Drawing inspiration from Chess, Helwig, Master of Pages to the Duke of Brunswick created a battle emulation game in 1780. According to Max Boot's book War Made New (2006, pg 122), sometime between 1803 and 1809, the Prussian General Staff developed war games, with staff officers moving metal pieces around on a game table (with blue pieces representing their forces and red pieces those of the enemy), using dice rolls to indicate random chance and with a referee scoring the results. Increasingly realistic variations became part of military training in the 19th century in many nations, and were called "kriegsspiel" or "wargames". Wargames or military exercises are still an important part of military training today.

Wargaming moved from professional training to the hobby market with the publication of Little Wars, children's toy soldier game, by H.G. Wells in 1913. A niche hobby of wargaming emerged for adults that recreated model games around actual battles from the Napoleonic period onward. Although a single marker or miniature figure typically represented a squad of soldiers, some "skirmish level" or "man to man" games did exist where one figure represented one entity only.

The board wargame Diplomacy, invented by Allan B. Calhamer in 1954 and released in 1959, made social interaction and interpersonal skills part of its gameplay. A live-action variant of Diplomacy named Slobbovia was used for character development rather than conflict.

In the late 1960s, fantasy elements were increasingly used in wargames. Linguist M. A. R. Barker began to use wargame-like sessions to develop his creation Tékumel, In 1970, the New England Wargamers Association demonstrated a fantasy wargame called Middle Earth at a convention of the Military Figure Collectors Association. Fantasy writer Greg Stafford created the board wargame White Bear and Red Moon to explore conflicts in his fantasy world Glorantha, though it did not see publication until 1974.

Gary Gygax of the University of Minnesota's wargaming society developed a set of rules for a late medieval milieu. This unusual wargame saw publication in 1971 under the name Chainmail. Although Chainmail was a historical game, later editions included an appendix for adding fantasy elements such as wizards and dragons.

A wargame session was held at the University of Minnesota in 1969, with Dave Wesely as the moderator, in which the players represented single characters in a Napoleonic scenario centering on a small town named Braunstein. This did not lead to any further experimentation in the same vein immediately, but the ground had been laid. It actually bore greater resemblance to later LARP games than what would conventionally be thought of as a role-playing game. Wesely would, later in the year, run a second "Braunstein," placing the players in the roles of government officials and revolutionaries in a fictional banana republic. The two games would be used partially by Dave Arneson who was a participant, to focus his ideas regarding a fantasy realm known as Blackmoor, and by 1971, Arneson would be running what could be conventionally recognized as a role-playing game based on his Blackmoor world.

Blackmoor contained core elements that would become widespread in fantasy gaming: hit points, experience points, character levels, armor class, and dungeon crawls. Like the wargames it grew from, Blackmoor used miniature figures and terrain grids to illustrate the action. The key difference with the Blackmoor games, which allowed it to become a game distinct from the wargame-based Braunsteins, was the ability of the players to set their own character goals, in addition to the scenario goals set by Arneson. Arneson and Gygax then met and collaborated on the first Dungeons & Dragons game."

History of role-playing games - Wikipedia

History of wargaming

Military exercise

Modeling and simulation

Virtual military