A Proper Gander At Propaganda

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"Propaganda in the United States is spread by both government and media entities. Propaganda is information, ideas, or rumors deliberately spread widely to influence opinions. It's used in advertising, radio, newspaper, posters, books, television, and other media."  -  Propaganda in the United States - Wikipedia

"A man without a government is like a fish without a bicycle.” Alvaro Koplovich

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Army Defense Command: Cartoon Super Powers Revealed

Photographic Cartoons Can't Hurt Anyone

Hollywood/Lookout Mountain Studio style special effects are no substitute for real weaponry. The highly edited military footage you are about to watch would seem to be the result of film techniques and are not actual weapons as advertised. Even some of the aircraft you are about to see are not as real as claimed. Film making techniques have been fooling eyes and minds for over a century.

It seems that such weaponry is more the product of Hollywood fantasy than any real military industrial effort.

Models Of Military Jets & Magic Missiles Can't Harm Anyone

Missiles, rockets, explosions and flying aircraft have long been emulated on screen with believable miniature film illusions. This footage is no different. The smoke moves too fast, the scale and perspective tends to be off and many of the explosions are obviously Hollywood special effect work. The rockets in this footage tend to move a lot faster than the rockets we see in the NASA footage. This logical contradiction is more evidence of fakery. The fact is the NASA footage is as fake as everything else. All of this propaganda is made of very short clips of special effect footage that are edited together to form a cohesive visual narrative. This is all an illusion, of course, but most people have been long conditioned by authoritative voice over narration to accept highly edited cartoon special effects as real. The real weapons of mass destruction are the culturally manipulative mental weaponry of the governmental approved multimedia news/noise machine.

Those of Us Serving In The Military Are Subject To Being Constantly Drilled With Fictional War Game Simulations Whether We Know It Or Not

It's not like most of the military personal can claim to watch the missiles launch or anything like that. Most spend their time in front of a computer screen. This is how the "magic" is done. Screens filter more so than reveal and computer military simulation is an old trick.

Do Not Fear Miniature Film Effects

Live action footage, real world photography and Hollywood crafted cartoon illusions have long been composited together to create (somewhat) believable imagery. Once you know what to look for you can tell miniature effects work from real footage. The Cold War era footage was done before computer generated imagery took over the field, so the illusions are easier to discern.

Relative proportion, camera perspective and the relative velocity vs distance, matter.

Army Air Defense Command (ARADCOM) - 1961 United States Army Educational Documentary - WDTVLIVE42

Precise guided missile weaponry is nothing but cartoonish nonsense.

Computers Are Good For Playing War Games, Not Combat Ready For Real War

Even computer technology that is meant to do one thing crashes and fails. Our Apple TV never works right. I find it hard to believe that the Military would rely on computers to control weaponry at all. Considering all the times computers crash and freeze and otherwise fail to work as advertised, I'd say it's safe to say that the Military uses computers to simulate war more than actually using computers to conduct war. Military claims of super magical computer guided missile weaponry would seem to be the stuff of the imagination.

Military simulation - Wikipedia

Lookout Mountain Air Force Station - Wikipedia

Mini-Weaponry

"A miniature effect is a special effect created for motion pictures and television programs using scale models. Scale models are often combined with high speed photography or matte shots to make gravitational and other effects appear convincing to the viewer. The use of miniatures has largely been superseded by computer-generated imagery in the contemporary cinema.

Where a miniature appears in the foreground of a shot, this is often very close to the camera lens — for example when matte painted backgrounds are used. Since the exposure is set to the object being filmed so the actors appear well lit, the miniature must be over-lit in order to balance the exposure and eliminate any depth of field differences that would otherwise be visible. This foreground miniature usage is referred to as forced perspective. Another form of miniature effect uses stop motion animation.

Use of scale models in the creation of visual effects by the entertainment industry dates back to the earliest days of cinema. Models and miniatures are copies of people, animals, buildings, settings and objects. Miniatures or models are used to represent things that do not really exist, or that are too expensive or difficult to film in reality, such as explosions, floods or fires."

Miniature effect - Wikipedia

Miniature faking - Wikipedia

A Towering Super Power Failure

Nation states are as fake as the super weaponry of the so-called world super powers. Governments work for the same global banking elite managerial caste that manage the whole global show. Government does not serve humanity, we exist to serve it. Wars and other types of conflict are scripted contrivances designed to keep us believing in existential threats and the need for protective government we do not need. Wars are designed to keep us as wage slaves turning the wheel of industry for all time.

The Art of Combining Live Action & Miniatures: James Bond Fakes It

An early version of the United States Missile Defense System.

The current system of the 21st century makes liberal use of computer graphics.

James Bond 007 Diamonds Are Forever Chinese Man Catches Fire

Spectacular Action

"That’s not to say 007 didn’t serve up some spectacular action in the meantime, nor has he failed to do so since. In The Living Daylights, Bond drops a bomb from a Hercules transport aircraft on to a bridge in order to thwart an advancing convoy of Russian tanks. In this extract from Nora Lee’s article 007×4 in Cinefex 33, veteran special effects supervisor John Richardson describes the visual sleight of hand employed to create the shot:

“There never was a bridge like the one you see in the film. Well, there was a little bridge. Lengthwise it was the same as the one you see on screen, but heightwise it was at most fifteen or twenty feet above the river bed. We constructed a foreground miniature of the ravine and a different bridge. We used the existing bridge from the handrail down to the road level so that you could see vehicles driving along it, but everything beneath that was a miniature.”

This use of miniatures – ever a staple of the Bond movies – continues to the present day. In Skyfall, the explosions at both the MI6 headquarters and Bond’s family residence were enacted using models. Describing the former, here’s an extract from Joe Fordham’s article Old Dog, New Tricks in Cinefex 133:

“Chris Corbould’s special effects team built a 14-foot-tall, ¼-scale miniature representing the central tower and offices of the MI6 building, and then rigged the structure with pyrotechnics. Visual effects supervisor Steve Begg oversaw the element shoot at Pinewood Studios, using a pair of Arri Alexa cameras running at high speed. Peerless Camera Company then composited the miniature explosion into plates of the real Secret Service building photographed from Vauxhall Bridge, and blended the miniature with additional pyrotechnics and CG debris.”  "

"The visual and special effects in these early years were the province of industry stalwarts such as Roy Field, Frank George, John Stears and Wally Veevers. There was even a brief contribution by legendary matte artist Albert Whitlock, who provided some essential scene-setting spectacle for Diamonds Are Forever, and whose paintings are showcased on Peter Cook’s ever-reliable Matte Shot blog.

When Live and Let Die came along in 1973, the 007 team recruited Derek Meddings, whose modelmaking background with Gerry Anderson on shows such as Fireball XL5 and Thunderbirds allowed the “big set” visions of production designer Ken Adam to be realised in miniature form.

In this extract from Don McGregor’s 1981 interview in Starlog 49, The Man Who Creates The Magic For James Bond, Meddings describes the submarine-swallowing supertanker seen in The Spy Who Loved Me:

“Nobody suspected that the supertanker was a miniature until the front opened, and then, lots of people still thought there was a boat that did actually have a front that opened. Even the people who were originally going to supply us with a real tanker went to the premiere of The Spy Who Loved Me and they had forgotten they had not rented their tanker to us. They said to the director or the producer, ‘I can’t remember when you used our tanker.’ And he said, ‘We never used your tanker.’ There was never one shot in the whole film with a real tanker. We built our miniature tanker at Pinewood Studios; I had it built 63 feet long. It had a crew of three, all special effects men who ran it. We shipped it out to the Bahamas, and shot those scenes all at sea.”  "

J is for James Bond - Cinefex Blog

Read the complete article at the Starlog online archive

(see article index for more)