A Proper Gander At Propaganda

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"Propaganda in the United States is spread by both government and media entities. Propaganda is information, ideas, or rumors deliberately spread widely to influence opinions. It's used in advertising, radio, newspaper, posters, books, television, and other media."  -  Propaganda in the United States - Wikipedia

"A man without a government is like a fish without a bicycle.” Alvaro Koplovich

Article index

An Atomic Enola Daze: Nuclear Radiation Turns The World Gay

 

Tall Tales From Fabled World Wars Never Die

 

The Enola Gay: An Impossible Mission

Atom bombs are the product of Hollywood wizardry. Such magic can ignore very real and demonstrable principles of nature. Here the speed of the aircraft reveals the Hollywood historical hoax for what it is.

 

The Enola Gay Can't Fly 11.5 Miles in Just 43 Seconds

"The plane was flying at a speed of 328 miles per hour as the bombardier, Major Thomas W. Ferebee, took control of the plane for the bombing run. Finding his aiming point, he let Little Boy fall away from the Enola Gay. Tibbets threw the bomber into its 150-degree escape maneuver, so that they were 11.5 miles away 43 seconds later, when Little Boy exploded 1,900 feet above the ground."

source: Enola Gay - In Depth Tutorials and Information

 

This legendary maneuver is impossible.

This account describes the Enola Gay flying 11.5 miles in 43 seconds from where it dropped the bomb, not from where the atom bomb was supposed to have been detonated, and as we shall learn, based on Colonel Paul Tibbets, the pilot, and tail gunner testimony, detonation distance was 9 miles. Clearly the 11.5 miles refers to the distance the Enola Gay traveled away from the spot where it dropped the Atom Bomb.

 

The Problem With The Mission Impossible:

Flying Fortresses Can't Fly At 962.7 MPH, They Have A Top Speed of 350 MPH!

The account above tells us that the Enola Gay flew at a speed of 328 mph and yet managed the impossible feat of covering a distance of 11.5 miles in just 43 seconds. This works out to an impossible 960 mph or so. At the plane's top speed of 350 mph, the Enola Gay could only be 4 or so miles away.

It would take the Enola Gay more like two minutes to travel 11.5 miles.

 

The Atom Bomb "Little Boy" Took 43 Seconds To Fall

"The release at 08:15 (Hiroshima time) went as planned, and the Little Boy took 43 seconds to fall from the aircraft flying at 31,060 feet (9,470 m) to the predetermined detonation height about 1,968 feet (600 m) above the city. Enola Gay traveled 11.5 mi (18.5 km) before it felt the shock waves from the blast. Although buffeted by the shock, neither Enola Gay nor The Great Artiste was damaged."

source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enola_Gay#Hiroshima_mission_2

 

A Mathematical Revelation of A Not So Great Artiste: Over 960 MPH is Impossible

The highest speed that the airplane carrying the atom bomb could reach was 350 mph or 5.83333 miles per minute or 0.0972222 miles per second.

43 seconds later the Enola Gay was supposed to be an impossible 11.5 miles away.

The Enola Gay could not be more than a little over 4 miles away from the point where it dropped the Atom Bomb. It could not travel 11.5 miles in that amount of time as claimed by the United States Military. Even if we consider a speed of sound delay for the shockwaves there are still problems with this particular narrative.

 

Tthe Enola Gay would have had to travel at an impossible speed of over 960 miles an hour to cover 11.5 miles in 43 seconds.

 

Pythagoras Proves The Atomic Bomb Story A Hoax

Detonation Distance Has to Be Greater Than 9 Miles

The Bomb fell 5.5113636 miles before detonating. The Enola Gay flew 11.5 miles. Detonation distance is supposed to be 9 miles.

Put the numbers into the calculator and you will see another problem with this narrative. The math tells the story. When we plug the numbers in we can see that the Enola Gay would have had to have been at least 12.7518 miles away from the point of detonation, and this assumes that the bomb simply fell straight down which it could not do. The narrative tells us that the Enola Gay did a 160 degree turn and was 11.5 miles away 43 seconds later when the bomb exploded. The turn itself would eat up a good amount of that time, and yet this time is ignored and not mentioned as far as I can tell. The bomb would continue moving in a forward motion of course, thanks to momentum, but the atmosphere would work to slow its speed down. This would cause that 12.7518 miles distance to increase and not to decrease to 9 miles. The bomb and plane are traveling in near opposite directions. The plane travels 11.5 miles, in 43 seconds, from that spot while the bomb travels in 150 or 160 degrees in a different direction, while it falls. (Horizontal motion is independent of vertical motion. A dropped bullet hits the ground at the same time a bullet fired from a gun does.)

see: http://ncalculators.com/number-conversion/pythagoras-theorem.htm

"The bomb was dropped at approximately 08:15(JST) 6 August 1945. After falling for 44.4 seconds, the time and barometric triggers started the firing mechanism. The detonation happened at an altitude of 1,968 ± 50 feet (600 ± 15 m)."

source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Boy#Bombing_of_Hiroshima

"The release at 08:15 (Hiroshima time) went as planned, and the Little Boy took 43 seconds to fall from the aircraft flying at 31,060 feet (9,470 m) to the predetermined detonation height about 1,968 feet (600 m) above the city. Enola Gay traveled 11.5 mi (18.5 km) before it felt the shock waves from the blast.[14] Although buffeted by the shock, neither Enola Gay nor The Great Artiste was damaged."

source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enola_Gay#Hiroshima_mission_2

 

Little Boy Took 43 or 44.4 Seconds To Fall

43 or 44.4 seconds? Which is it? Why so many contradictions? Why Never A Straight Answer? Is this the work of an early NASA?

 

160 Degree Turn

"When the bomb was released, the Enola Gay's nose lurched up, the plane freed of a four-and-a-half-ton weight. Mr. Tibbets immediately steered into a 160-degree turn, a maneuver long planned and practiced, to take the bomber away from the explosion. He was aware of the stress the move put on the aircraft. "If I did it any further," he said of the turn, "I'd shake the tail off the airplane."  At the same time, the crew was awaiting the explosion, some even fearing the bomb might be a dud, Mr. van Kirk said. "Everyone was counting, 'One thousand one, one thousand two . . . .' " The bomb fell for 43 seconds."

source: http://www.nytimes.com/1995/08/06/world/hiroshima-enola-gay-s-crew-recalls-the-flight-into-a-new-era.html?pagewanted=all

 

9: The Point of Detonation

"The Enola Gay, according to Tibbets, was nine miles from the point of detonation when it was rocked violently by the shock wave."

source: http://www.airforcemag.com/MagazineArchive/Documents/2010/October%202010/1010atomic.pdf

 

11.5: The Distance Traveled When Hit By Shockwave

"Enola Gay traveled 11.5 mi (18.5 km) before it felt the shock waves from the blast. Although buffeted by the shock, neither Enola Gay nor The Great Artiste was damaged."

source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enola_Gay#Hiroshima_mission_2

 

or 11.5: The Distance Traveled When Bomb Exploded

Why a contradiction?

One account says one thing and another claims something else. and in both cases there still is not enough time for Enola Gay to perform such a stunt.

"The plane was flying at a speed of 328 miles per hour as the bombardier, Major Thomas W. Ferebee, took control of the plane for the bombing run. Finding his aiming point, he let Little Boy fall away from the Enola Gay. Tibbets threw the bomber into its 150-degree escape maneuver, so that they were 11.5 miles away 43 seconds later, when Little Boy exploded 1,900 feet above the ground."

source: Enola Gay - In Depth Tutorials and Information

 

The account is telling us that the Enola Gay travelled 11.5 miles after dropping the bomb before the shockwave was felt by the crew, with a claimed 9 miles from the point of detonation. This would seem to be a contradiction. The shockwaves are supposed to travel at the speed of sound or some 1100 feet per second. Shockwaves are not instantaneous . Does this really make sense?

The Enola Gay has a top speed of 350 mph. 350 mph is 5.8333 miles per minute. The Enola Gay would need 1.97 minutes to fly 11.5 miles at top speed without making a turn. The bomb took 43 seconds to drop and the shockwave would take about another 43 seconds to reach the 9 miles distance the tail gunner claimed. 86 seconds is not enough time. The Enola Gay needed more like two minutes, ignoring time it takes to execute the 160 degree turn. 

 

Factoring In Atomic Shock @ 1100 Feet Per Second: 43 Seconds Become 86.2 Seconds

"Tail gunner Caron was the only member of the crew with a direct view. He could see the shock wave approaching at almost 1,100 feet per second, the leading edge made visible by condensing moisture. The Enola Gay, according to Tibbets, was nine miles from the point of detonation when it was rocked violently by the shock wave."

source: http://www.airforcemag.com/MagazineArchive/Documents/2010/October%202010/1010atomic.pdf

 

Rocking The Shockwave To Gain Some Perspective And Context

It would take 118.285741322 seconds for the Enola Gay to travel 11.5 miles at top speed. That is almost two minutes. The shockwave would travel some 24 miles in that amount of time by comparison.

 

160-degree turn

"When the bomb was released, the Enola Gay's nose lurched up, the plane freed of a four-and-a-half-ton weight. Mr. Tibbets immediately steered into a 160-degree turn, a maneuver long planned and practiced, to take the bomber away from the explosion. He was aware of the stress the move put on the aircraft. "If I did it any further," he said of the turn, "I'd shake the tail off the airplane."

source: http://www.nytimes.com/1995/08/06/world/hiroshima-enola-gay-s-crew-recalls-the-flight-into-a-new-era.html?pagewanted=all

 

Turning An Airplane Takes Time

According to the story the Enola Gay dropped the Atom Bomb and then the pilot began to turn the plane 160 degrees.

How could a large aircraft like the Enola Gay perform a 160 degree turn and still manage to get 11.5 miles away from where it dropped the Atom Bomb before getting hit by the shockwaves?

 

The waves are traveling over twice as fast as the aircraft. We are told the craft was 9 miles from the point of detonation. The shockwaves would take 43.2 seconds to reach a distance of 9 miles. So we have 43 seconds for the bomb to fall and a minimum of 43.2 seconds for the shockwave from the explosion to hit. Should we assume that the Enola Gay could make a 160 degree turn in 43 seconds or so? Turns have to take time.

 

This gives us 86.2 seconds of time.

How could the Enola Gay execute a 160 degree turn and travel 11.5 miles in a minute and twenty six seconds or so? Is that physically possible?

This is a "flying fortress" with a top speed of some 350 mph.

 

How Long Does It Take To Turn A Large Plane Around?

It would take an aircraft time to execute a 160 degree turn, especially a large heavy one, no? Consider that in the context of the 160 degree turn the Enola Gay legendarily made. Consider how much of the 86.2 seconds that would eat up. How could it be some 11.5 miles from where it dropped the bomb if this heavy and large airplane had to also execute a 160 degree turn? Does this really make sense? Could WWII era propeller based large aircraft perform a 160 degree turn in less than a  minute? How could the aircraft also manage to get 11.5 miles away from where it dropped the bomb, before experiencing the effects of the atomic blast?

If we assume that the turn took about 43 seconds we have about 43 seconds left for the plane to travel the impossible 11.5 miles in that amount of time.

How fast do you think the B29 could execute the 160 degree turn? Even if it took 20 seconds to make the turn there would still not be enough time for the plane to travel 11.5 miles at a speed of 350 mph. In one minute's time the Enola Gay could not get further than about 6 miles or so. 86 seconds is not enough time.

 

The Standard Turn

"A standard rate turn is defined as a 3° per second turn, which completes a 360° turn in 2 minutes. This is known as a 2-minute turn, or rate one (180°/min). Fast airplanes, or aircraft on certain precision approaches, use a half standard rate ('rate half' in some countries), but the definition of standard rate does not change."

source: Standard rate turn - Wikipedia

https://aviation.stackexchange.com/questions/8012/what-does-it-take-to-turn-a-747-around-180-degrees/8013

Boeing B-29 Superfortress "Enola Gay" | National Air and Space ...

 

How large of a turn does a flying fortress have to make? And how long does it take to make it?

Could we imagine it would take the Enola Gay say 43 seconds or so to execute a 160 degree turn, if we were to assume a World War Two era flying fortress capable of such a feat? If the Enola Gay did not have to turn, it still could not travel 11.5 miles in 86 seconds. It would only be able to travel some 8 miles in that amount of time. The Enola Gay would need about 2 minutes to fly 11.5 miles at its top speed of 350 mph without turning.

A 43 second turn leaves us with 43 seconds and a 962.7 mph speed for the Enola Gay, anyway.

 

Shock waves at the speed of light that do not blind the tail gunner with a view to kill for.

"At 8:16 a.m., Hiroshima time, after a 43-second drop, the atomic bomb exploded at the preset altitude of 1,890 feet. More than half of the city was destroyed in a flash and about 80,000 Japanese were killed instantly. A brilliant flash of light swept the aircraft, and the mushroom cloud rose more than three miles above the devastation of Hiroshima.

Tail gunner Caron was the only member of the crew with a direct view. He could see the shock wave approaching at almost 1,100 feet per second, the leading edge made visible by condensing moisture. The Enola Gay, according to Tibbets, was nine miles from the point of detonation when it was rocked violently by the shock wave."

source: http://www.airforcemag.com/MagazineArchive/Documents/2010/October%202010/1010atomic.pdf

 

Shockwaves Moving At The Speed of Sound

"As it expands, the peak pressures of the blast wave diminish and the speed of propagation decreases from the initial supersonic velocity to that of sound in the transmitting medium. However, upon reflection from the earth's surface, the pressure in the wave will be reinforced by the fusion of the incident and the reflected wave (the Mach effect) described below."

source: http://www.globalsecurity.org/wmd/intro/nuke-blast.htm

 

Bombs Away: As The Bomb Falls The Plane Turns

"When the bomb was released, the Enola Gay's nose lurched up, the plane freed of a four-and-a-half-ton weight. Mr. Tibbets immediately steered into a 160-degree turn, a maneuver long planned and practiced, to take the bomber away from the explosion. He was aware of the stress the move put on the aircraft. "If I did it any further," he said of the turn, "I'd shake the tail off the airplane."  At the same time, the crew was awaiting the explosion, some even fearing the bomb might be a dud, Mr. van Kirk said. "Everyone was counting, 'One thousand one, one thousand two . . . .' " The bomb fell for 43 seconds."

source: http://www.nytimes.com/1995/08/06/world/hiroshima-enola-gay-s-crew-recalls-the-flight-into-a-new-era.html?pagewanted=all

"During the 45-minute climb to the 31,000-foot bombing altitude, the weather plane flying ahead of the Enola Gay reported favorable conditions over Hiroshima. The plane was flying at a speed of 328 miles per hour as the bombardier, Major Thomas W. Ferebee, took control of the plane for the bombing run. Finding his aiming point, he let Little Boy fall away from the Enola Gay. Tibbets threw the bomber into its 150-degree escape maneuver, so that they were 11.5 miles away 43 seconds later, when Little Boy exploded 1,900 feet above the ground. After a blinding flash of light, Hiroshima was hidden beneath a huge, boiling cloud, that was simultaneously incredible and terrible. The bomb’s estimated yield was 12,500 tons of TNT, a common high explosive. Captain Theodore J. Van Kirk, the Enola Gay’s navigator, later admitted to thinking as he watched the destruction, “Thank God the war is over and I don’t have to get shot at any more. I can go home.” The Enola Gay then returned to Tinian and landed at 2:58 p.m."

source: Enola Gay - In Depth Tutorials and Information

 

Wartime Makes It All Ok

"In wartime, the B-29 was capable of flight at altitudes up to 31,850 feet (9,710 m),[26] at speeds of up to 350 mph (560 km/h) (true airspeed). This was its best defense, because Japanese fighters could barely reach that altitude, and few could catch the B-29 even if they did attain that altitude. Only the heaviest of anti-aircraft weapons could reach it, and since the Axis forces did not have proximity fuzes, hitting or damaging the aircraft from the ground in combat proved difficult."

"The release at 08:15 (Hiroshima time) went as planned, and the Little Boy took 43 seconds to fall from the aircraft flying at 31,060 feet (9,470 m) to the predetermined detonation height about 1,968 feet (600 m) above the city. Enola Gay traveled 11.5 mi (18.5 km) before it felt the shock waves from the blast. Although buffeted by the shock, neither Enola Gay nor The Great Artiste was damaged."

"After leaving Tinian, the aircraft made their way separately to Iwo Jima, where they rendezvoused at 2,440 meters (8,010 ft) and set course for Japan. The aircraft arrived over the target in clear visibility at 9,855 meters (32,333 ft). Captain William S. "Deak" Parsons of Project Alberta, who was in command of the mission, armed the bomb during the flight to minimize the risks during takeoff. His assistant, Second LieutenantMorris R. Jeppson, removed the safety devices 30 minutes before reaching the target area.[13]

The release at 08:15 (Hiroshima time) went as planned, and the Little Boy took 43 seconds to fall from the aircraft flying at 31,060 feet (9,470 m) to the predetermined detonation height about 1,968 feet (600 m) above the city. Enola Gay traveled 11.5 mi (18.5 km) before it felt the shock waves from the blast.[14] Although buffeted by the shock, neither Enola Gay nor The Great Artiste was damaged.[15]

The detonation created a blast equivalent to 16 kilotons of TNT (67 TJ).[16] The U-235 weapon was considered very inefficient, with only 1.7% of its fissile material fissioning.[17] The radius of total destruction was about one mile (1.6 km), with resulting fires across 4.4 square miles (11 km2).[18] Americans estimated that 4.7 square miles (12 km2) of the city were destroyed. Japanese officials determined that 69% of Hiroshima's buildings were destroyed and another 6–7% damaged.[19] Some 70,000–80,000 people, 30% of the city's population, were killed by the blast and resultant firestorm,[20] and another 70,000 injured.[21] Out of those killed, 20,000 were soldiers."

"A transport developed from the B-29 was the Boeing C-97 Stratofreighter, first flown in 1944, followed by its commercial airliner variant, the Boeing Model 377 Stratocruiser in 1947. This bomber-to-airliner derivation was similar to the B-17/Model 307 evolution. In 1948 Boeing introduced a tanker variant of the B-29 as the KB-29, followed by the Model 377-derivative KC-97 introduced in 1950. A heavily modified line of outsized-cargo variants of the Stratocruiser is the Guppy / Mini Guppy / Super Guppy which remain in service today with operators including NASA."

All Roads Lead To Roswell

"The Great Artiste was a U.S. Army Air Forces Silverplate B-29 bomber (B-29-40-MO 44-27353, Victor number 89), assigned to the 393d Bomb Squadron, 509th Composite Group. The aircraft was named for its bombardier, Captain Kermit Beahan, in reference to his bombing talents. It flew 12 training and practice missions in which it bombed Japanese-held Pacific islands and dropped pumpkin bombs on targets in Japan. It was the only aircraft to participate in both the bombing of Hiroshima and the bombing of Nagasaki, albeit as an observation aircraft on each mission.

After the war ended it returned with the 509th Composite Group to Roswell Army Air Field, New Mexico. It was scrapped in September 1949 after being heavily damaged in an accident at Goose Bay Air Base, Labrador, the year before."

"The Enola Gay ( /ᵻˈnoʊlə ˈɡeɪ/) is a Boeing B-29 Superfortress bomber, named for Enola Gay Tibbets, the mother of the pilot, Colonel Paul Tibbets, who selected the aircraft while it was still on the assembly line. On 6 August 1945, during the final stages of World War II, it became the first aircraft to drop an atomic bomb. The bomb, code-named "Little Boy", was targeted at the city of Hiroshima, Japan, and caused unprecedented destruction. Enola Gay participated in the second atomic attack as the weather reconnaissance aircraft for the primary target of Kokura. Clouds and drifting smoke resulted in a secondary target, Nagasaki, being bombed instead.

After the war, the Enola Gay returned to the United States, where it was operated from Roswell Army Air Field, New Mexico. In May 1946, it was flown to Kwajalein for the Operation Crossroads nuclear tests in the Pacific, but was not chosen to make the test drop at Bikini Atoll. Later that year it was transferred to the Smithsonian Institution, and spent many years parked at air bases exposed to the weather and souvenir hunters, before being disassembled and transported to the Smithsonian's storage facility at Suitland, Maryland, in 1961.

In the 1980s, veterans groups engaged in a call for the Smithsonian to put the aircraft on display, leading to an acrimonious debate about exhibiting the aircraft without a proper historical context. The cockpit and nose section of the aircraft were exhibited at the National Air and Space Museum (NASM) in downtown Washington, D.C., for the bombing's 50th anniversary in 1995, amid controversy. Since 2003, the entire restored B-29 has been on display at NASM's Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center. The last survivor of its crew, Theodore Van Kirk, died on July 28, 2014, at the age of 93."

sources: Boeing B-29 Superfortress

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enola_Gay

The Great Artiste - Wikipedia

43 Seconds to Hiroshima: The First Atomic Mission. An autobiography of Richard H. Nelson, "Enola Gay" Radioman.

 

"The fall to the burst altitude of 600 meters lasted 43 seconds, at that moment Little Boy had a vertical velocity of 335 meters/second, just a bit faster than sound."

source: The Enola Gay - The Nuclear Weapon Archive

 

"B-29 Superfortresses were only used in the Pacific Theater of WWII."

"The Superfortress was initially designed as a high altitude bomber, but after poor results, it was primarily used in night time low-altitude bombing missions."

source: http://www.boldmethod.com/blog/lists/2015/03/facts-about-the-b-29-superfortress/

 

Faking Air Raids And Massive Urban Fire Bombings with Ronny Reagan

Reagan took part in one of the major "secrets of war, ranking up with the atom bomb project"

"... creating a complete miniature of Tokyo, so authentic in detail that even top Air Corps generals could not distinguish it from reality."

 

Don't Worry About The Atom Bomb: Be Happy It's Fake

The contradictory Enola Gay account, with what seems to be mathematically provable problems,  and the obviously fake atomic bomb footage, along with the fact the guys involved with the Manhattan Project were just propagandists, shows us that we should be relieved we need never fear a nuclear winter or any other kind of nuclear devastation as mythically promised for so long.

 

Back To The La La Land of Make Believe

"Back in Hollywood, First Lieutenant Ronald Reagan was taking part in what he refers to in his autobiography as one of the major "secrets of war, ranking up with the atom bomb project": creating a complete miniature of Tokyo, so authentic in detail that even top Air Corps generals could not distinguish it from reality. Footage of fake bomb runs on the toy city were then used to brief bombing crews, who were taken by Reagnan’s voice over narrative all the way to his dramatic “Bombs away.” As areas of Tokyo were burned out, Reagan tells how the Hollywood team would “burn out” their counterparts in “our target scene,” obliterating along with the city, the boundaries between illusion and reality.”

source: War Stars: The Superweapon and the American Imagination

"One of the war's best-kept secrets was a film called "Target Tokyo," which Reagan narrated. It simulated an actual air raid on Japan. Special-effects men were flown to Washington for briefings on every known landmark--cemeteries, rice paddies, factories, geisha joints."

"The first fire-bomb target simulated was Ota, where Nakajima was mass-producing the deadly new fighter plane, Ki-84. From match sticks, piano wire, plaster and cheesecloth, the FMPU's model makers replicated the entire route to Ota."

"Above the 90-by-90-foot scale model swung a camera crane with a clever synchronous interlock drive designed by Sgt. Don Klopfel. Cotton clouds were added for further realism."

see here for more: Faking World War Two: Ronald Reagan Targets Tokyo — A Proper ...

 

Why fake it?

Curtis LeMay Claimed High Altitude Precision Bombing Will Not Work As Advertised

This would be one reason to fake images of war. There are other reasons too, of course.

"Curtis Emerson LeMay (November 15, 1906 – October 1, 1990) was a general in the United States Air Force and the vice presidential running mate of American Independent Party candidate George Wallace in the 1968 presidential election.

Curtis LeMay is credited with designing and implementing an effective, but also controversial, systematic strategic bombing campaign in the Pacific theater of World War II. During the war, he was known for planning and executing a massive fire bombing campaign against cities in Japan and a crippling minelaying campaign in Japan's internal waterways. After the war, he initiated the Berlin airlift, then reorganized the Strategic Air Command (SAC) into an effective instrument of nuclear war. He served as Chief of Staff of the U.S. Air Force from 1961 until his retirement in 1965."

"In August 1944, LeMay transferred to the China-Burma-India theater and directed first the XX Bomber Command in China and then the XXI Bomber Command in the Pacific. LeMay was later placed in charge of all strategic air operations against the Japanese home islands. 

LeMay soon concluded that the techniques and tactics developed for use in Europe against the Luftwaffe were unsuitable against Japan. His Boeing B-29 Superfortress bombers flying from China were dropping their bombs near their targets only 5% of the time. Operational losses of aircraft and crews were unacceptably high owing to Japanese daylight air defenses and continuing mechanical problems with the B-29. In January 1945, LeMay was transferred from China to relieve Brigadier General Haywood S. Hansell as commander of the XXI Bomber Command in the Marianas. 

He became convinced that high-altitude precision bombing would be ineffective, given the usually cloudy weather over Japan. Furthermore, bombs dropped from the B-29s at high altitude (above 20,000 feet (6,100 m)) were often blown off of their trajectories by a consistently powerful jet stream over the Japanese home islands, which dramatically reduced the effectiveness of the high-altitude raids. Because Japanese air defenses made daytime bombing below jet stream-affected altitudes too perilous, LeMay finally switched to low-altitude nighttime incendiary attacks on Japanese targets, a tactic senior commanders had been advocating for some time.[9][10]Japanese cities were largely constructed of combustible materials such as wood and paper. Precision high-altitude daylight bombing was ordered to proceed only when weather permitted or when specific critical targets were not vulnerable to area bombing. General LeMay was informed by a senior staff member, Colonel William P. Fisher, that bomber pilots were turning back from these low altitude bombing runs due to heavy anti-aircraft fire from Japanese defense forces. Fisher suggested to LeMay that crews who achieved successful strike rates should be rewarded by being released from their deployment. LeMay implemented this unorthodox plan and the strike rate went up to eighty percent."

Curtis Le May At Lookout Mountain The Motion Picture Facility

"Beginning with Trinity, the very first nuclear test in 1945, there was an obvious need to document nuclear testing with still and moving pictures photography. The film was needed for the study and understanding of the behavior of nuclear weapons. In 1946, in support of Operation Crossroads, the first atomic bomb test in the Pacific, the joint task force conducting the test had pulled together a provisional photographic unit of still and motion picture photographers to document the test. Most of these photographers were part of a small detachment of the 1st Motion Picture Unit from Long Island, New York.

At the conclusion of Operation Crossroads, it was determined that a permanent photographic unit, providing specialized photography and sound recording, should be established, trained, equipped and organized to obtain scientific, technical and documentary photography of recurring atomic bomb tests. Brigadier General P.T. Cullen, who had commanded the Air Photo Unit on Operation Crossroads, was directed to find a site in the Los Angeles area suitable for the accomplishment of motion picture documentation of Joint Task Force 7 (JTF-7), Operation Sandstone. After an extensive survey of the Los Angeles area, the General chose the Air Force facility at 8935 Wonderland Avenue. The facility had been constructed on two acres of land in 1943 at a cost of $132,000 to house the Los Angeles Flight Control Center. After World War II, the Los Angeles Flight Control Center was closed and the grounds and building declared surplus to the needs of the Air Force. In the fall of 1947 the 1352d Motion Picture Squadron was activated at Lookout Mountain."

"In the fall of 1949, Lt. General Curtis LeMay decided that the production of motion pictures was not a proper function of the Strategic Air Command. Lookout Mountain Laboratory and all its staff were transferred to the Air Proving Ground under the command of Lt. General William E. Kepner. 

In December, 1949, Lookout Mountain Laboratory and the 4881st Motion Picture Squadron were assigned the responsibility for accomplishing all documentary photography for Joint Task Force 3, Operation Greenhouse. This was the first time that a photographic unit, specifically staffed and equipped for documentation of an atomic weapons test, existed during the planning stages of such test. As a result, it was possible to pre-plan the photography."

sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curtis_LeMay

Lookout Mountain Air Force Station - Wikipedia

 

An Ill Advised Post Script:

Simulating Atom Bomb Explosions

"Paul W. Tibbets held a unique distinction in the annals of history. He was the pilot of the Enola Gay (which was named after his mother, Enola Gay Tibbets) and thus was the man who carried out the command to drop the atomic bomb known as “Little Boy” on the Japanese city of Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, making him the first person to detonate an atomic bomb in warfare. As was the conventional view for Americans of his time, Tibbets never expressed any pangs of regret about the act of killing upwards of 60,000 people in a matter of minutes, tending instead to emphasize the combat fatalities averted by bringing the World War II to a speedier end.

It is likely that he was even less apologetic about his participation in an air show 31 years later in which he re-enacted the Hiroshima bombing using a restored B-29 Superfortress (the same model as the Enola Gay) named “Fifi,” a reference to the co-pilot’s girlfriend. This event took place on October 10, 1976, in front of a large paying crowd reported as 18,000 (but possibly as large as 40,000) in Harlingen, Texas. Tibbets reenacted his historic Enola Gay mission—the event actually included a “simulated” atomic explosion—and repeated the flight twice the next day. 

The impetus of the event was to raise money for a WWII aircraft preservation group called the Confederate Air Force—today the group goes by the name the Commemorative Air Force. Fascinatingly, the U.S. Army supplied a detonation team to assist with the “atomic-bomb simulator,” in other words “a barrel of explosives” that produced the crowd-pleasing mushroom-shaped cloud, which you can see in the news article reproduced below."


"This was not the first time the Hiroshima bombing had been re-enacted. On October 27, 1945, the Los Angeles Coliseum hosted an event called “Tribute To Victory.” According to Daniel Tiffany’s book Toy Medium: Materialism and Modern Lyric, “this early simulation of an atomic blast hinted at the ‘devastation’ associated with Hiroshima—an image ‘almost too real’ for the crowd.” That event, however, did not garner a crowd of forty thousand—it drew roughly a hundred thousand! Considering that the Coliseum event was just a few months after the end of World War II, the morbid curiosity and willingness to offend the Japanese were a little bit more understandable.

It’s doubtful whether many of the spectators in attendance found the 1976 air show in Harlingen to be in poor taste, but in any case it did cause a minor international incident. Understandably, when the citizens of Japan learned of this event, they were none too happy about it. 

The mayor of Hiroshima at that time was a man named Takeshi Araki, and apparently it took some doing to get him to believe that the incident had actually taken place. Araki called the re-enactment “a blasphemy” and “grotesque.” In a later press release he addressed the organizers of the air show: “What you have done insults the Japanese people who suffered from the bomb. I feel real rage and we shall protest to the U.S. government and all concerned.” Here was the reaction of Foreign Minister Zentaro Kosaka: “A bomb and a mushroom-shaped cloud is a real nightmare for the Japanese. Although it was a civilian air show, I cannot refrain from feeling badly. They lacked consideration for the feelings of others.”

source: http://dangerousminds.net/comments/us_sorry_for_fake_hiroshima