A Proper Gander At Propaganda

Truth Transcends Community

"Propaganda in the United States is spread by both government and media entities. Propaganda is information, ideas, or rumors deliberately spread widely to influence opinions. It's used in advertising, radio, newspaper, posters, books, television, and other media."  -  Propaganda in the United States - Wikipedia

"A man without a government is like a fish without a bicycle.” Alvaro Koplovich

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A Civil War Interlude: Who Was General Robert E. Lee, Anyway?

 

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The Famous Lees of America, The Lees of Virginia

An American Royal Family

1776 (1972 film) The Lees of Old Virginia w/ Reprise 1080p  source: Ad Co


"We the people" has no legal weight.

The Declaration of Independence is not legally binding. It is not the U.S. Constitution nor is it the Treaty of Paris from 1783.


Most Americans do not realize that "We the people" is old Revolutionary war rhetoric and the first broken political campaign promise.


The CIA & Military Intelligence Are Virtual Reality Warriors

Virginia is the home to military and intelligence facilities. Washington D.C. is older than Hollywood. D.C. is where American political theater got its start.

New York's Broadway and Disney Times Square spectacle, Hollywoods La La land of film fantasy and all the rest are like local dinner theater groups compared to the extravaganza that is and always has been, the political machinations of Washington D.C. based, National politics. The recent event in Charlottesville took place just outside of the Nation's flamboyant capital in the state of Virginia, the first British colony of those loyal to the King. This state is the home of the Lees, famous for originating independence day sales and so much more. The Lees appear to be Shakespeare lovers. A true theatrical troop like family of American mythic heroes to worship or revile, depending on the season.


Robert E. Lee of The Lee Family

Henry Lee, Father of Robert

"Major-General Henry "Light-Horse Harry" Lee III (January 29, 1756 – March 25, 1818) was an early American Patriot and politician who served as the ninth Governor of Virginia and as the Virginia Representative to the United States Congress. Lee's service during the American Revolution as a cavalry officer in the Continental Army earned him the nickname by which he is best known, "Light-Horse Harry". Lee was the father of Civil War-era Confederate general Robert E. Lee."

"Lee was born near Dumfries in the Colony of Virginia. He was the son of Col. Henry Lee II (1730–1787) of "Leesylvania" and Lucy Grymes (1734–1792) the "Lowland Beauty". His father was the second cousin of Richard Henry Lee, twelfth President of the Continental Congress. His mother was an aunt of the wife of Virginia Governor Thomas Nelson, Jr. His great-grandmother Mary Bland was also a grand-aunt of President Thomas Jefferson.

Lee was the grandson of Capt. Henry Lee I, a great-grandson of Richard Bland, and a great-great-grandson of William Randolph.[1] He was also a descendant of Theodorick Bland of Westover and Governor Richard Bennett."

Richard Henry Lee, Revolutionary Hero

"Richard Henry Lee (January 20, 1732 – June 19, 1794) was an American statesman from Virginia best known for the motion in the Second Continental Congress calling for the colonies' independence from Great Britain. He was a signatory to the Articles of Confederation, and his "resolution for independency" of June 1776 led to the United States Declaration of Independence, which Lee signed. He also served a one-year term as the President of the Congress of the Confederation, and was a United States Senator from Virginia from 1789 to 1792, serving during part of that time as the second President pro tempore of the upper house.

He was a member of the Lee family, a historically influential family in Virginia politics"

"Lee was born near Dumfries in the Colony of Virginia. He was the son of Col. Henry Lee II (1730–1787) of "Leesylvania" and Lucy Grymes (1734–1792) the "Lowland Beauty". His father was the second cousin of Richard Henry Lee, twelfth President of the Continental Congress. His mother was an aunt of the wife of Virginia Governor Thomas Nelson, Jr. His great-grandmother Mary Bland was also a grand-aunt of President Thomas Jefferson.

Lee was the grandson of Capt. Henry Lee I, a great-grandson of Richard Bland, and a great-great-grandson of William Randolph.[1] He was also a descendant of Theodorick Bland of Westover and Governor Richard Bennett."

Robert E. Lee: Statue

"Robert Edward Lee (January 19, 1807 – October 12, 1870) was an American general known for commanding the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia in the American Civil War from 1862 until his surrender in 1865. A son of Revolutionary War officer Henry "Light Horse Harry" Lee III, Lee was a top graduate of the United States Military Academyand an exceptional officer and military engineer in the United States Army for 32 years. During this time, he served throughout the United States, distinguished himself during the Mexican–American War, and served as Superintendent of the United States Military Academy.

When Virginia declared its secession from the Union in April 1861, Lee chose to follow his home state, despite his desire for the country to remain intact and an offer of a senior Union command.[1] During the first year of the Civil War, Lee served as a senior military adviser to President Jefferson Davis. Once he took command of the main field army in 1862 he soon emerged as a shrewd tactician and battlefield commander, winning most of his battles, all against far superior Union armies.[2][3] Lee's strategic foresight was more questionable, and both of his major offensives into Union territory ended in defeat.[4][5][6] Lee's aggressive tactics, which resulted in high casualties at a time when the Confederacy had a shortage of manpower, have come under criticism in recent years.[7] Lee surrendered his entire army to Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865. By this time, Lee had assumed supreme command of the remaining Southern armies; other Confederate forces swiftly capitulated after his surrender. Lee rejected the proposal of a sustained insurgency against the Union and called for reconciliation between the two sides.

After the war, Lee supported President Andrew Johnson's program of Reconstruction and intersectional friendship, while opposing the Radical Republican proposals to give freed slaves the vote and take the vote away from ex-Confederates. He urged them to rethink their position between the North and the South, and the reintegration of former Confederates into the nation's political life. Lee became the great Confederate hero of the War, a postwar icon of the "Lost Cause of the Confederacy" to some. But his popularity grew even in the North, especially after his death in 1870. Barracks at West Point built in 1962 are named after him."

The Lee Family

"The Lee family of the United States is a historically significant Virginiaand Maryland political family, whose many prominent members are known for their accomplishments in politics and the military. The family became prominent in colonial America when Richard Lee I ("The Immigrant") immigrated to Virginia in 1639 and made his fortune in tobacco.

Members of the family include Thomas Lee (1690–1750), a founder of the Ohio Company and a member of the Virginia House of Burgesses; Francis Lightfoot Lee (1734–1797) and Richard Henry Lee (1732–1794), signers of the United States Declaration of Independence; Thomas Sim Lee (1745–1819), Governor of Maryland and, most famous, General Robert E. Lee (1807–1870) Confederate States of America commander in the American Civil War. President Zachary Taylor and Chief Justice Edward Douglass White were also descendants of Richard Lee I. Confederate President Jefferson Davis married Sarah Knox Taylor, daughter of Zachary Taylor.

Most recently, family members have marked over two hundred years of political service in the United States, as Blair Lee III, a descendant of Richard Henry Lee, served as Lieutenant Governor of Maryland from 1971–1979 and Acting Governor of Maryland from 1978–1979. Charles Carter Lee, a descendant of Henry Lee III and a Superior Court Judge in Los Angeles County, was named the U.S. team's Chef de Mission by the United States Olympic Committee for the Beijing Olympics. The Lee Family of Virginia is also related to the Lee–Hamblin family of the American West through Richard Lee II."

Robert E. Lee:

"He urged them to rethink their position between the North and the South, and the reintegration of former Confederates into the nation's political life. Lee became the great Confederate hero of the War, a postwar icon of the "Lost Cause of the Confederacy" to some."

"But his popularity grew even in the North, especially after his death in 1870."

"Barracks at West Point built in 1962 are named after him."

sources: Robert E. Lee - Wikipedia

Henry "Light Horse Harry" Lee III

Richard Henry Lee

Lee family - Wikipedia


Another great call.

Link: http://hoaxbusterscall.blogspot.com


The Freemason Lees of Virginia

"Henry Lee III, Governor of Virginia, United States Congressman from Virginia, father of Confederate General Robert E. Lee. Hiram Lodge No. 59, Westmoreland County, Virginia. Richard Henry Lee, President of the Continental Congress, United States Senator from Virginia. Hiram Lodge No. 59, Westmoreland County, Virginia."

List of Freemasons (E–Z) - Wikipedia