A Proper Gander At Propaganda

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Show compassion for the victim.

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“WE SUPPORT LENNY POZNER AND ALL VICTIMS OF TRAGEDIES REPORTED BY NEWS MEDIA”

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The Revelation of Apollo's Lyrical Lisp: The Seven Notes of The Cosmic Octave Part Two

 
 
AAMORRIS.PSD copy.jpg

image source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musica_universalis#/media/File:Harmonyoftheworld.jpg

Pythagoras & The Universal Music of The Spheres

“Scott McGill, Professor of Classics, Rice University, and Christopher M. Johns-Krull, Professor of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, discuss Pythagoras, NASA, and the centuries that separate them. The Infinity Machine installation by artists Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller at the Byzantine Fresco Chapel evokes both ancient science-the "Music of the Spheres" theory advanced by sixth-century B.C.”

via: The Menil Collection

The Universal Music of The Spheres

"Musica universalis (literally universal music), also called Music of the spheres or Harmony of the Spheres, is an ancient philosophical concept that regards proportions in the movements of celestial bodies—the Sun, Moon, and planets—as a form of musica (the Medieval Latin term for music). This "music" is not usually thought to be literally audible, but a harmonic, mathematical or religious concept. The idea continued to appeal to thinkers about music until the end of the Renaissance, influencing scholars of many kinds, including humanists. Further scientific exploration has determined specific proportions in some orbital motion, described as orbital resonance."

"The discovery of the precise relation between the pitch of the musical note and the length of the string that produces it is attributed to Pythagoras. The Music of the Spheres incorporates the metaphysical principle that mathematical relationships express qualities or "tones" of energy which manifest in numbers, visual angles, shapes and sounds – all connected within a pattern of proportion. Pythagoras first identified that the pitch of a musical note is in inverse proportion to the length of the string that produces it, and that intervals between harmonious sound frequencies form simple numerical ratios. In a theory known as the Harmony of the Spheres, Pythagoras proposed that the Sun, Moon and planets all emit their own unique hum based on their orbital revolution, and that the quality of life on Earth reflects the tenor of celestial sounds which are physically imperceptible to the human ear. Subsequently, Plato described astronomy and music as "twinned" studies of sensual recognition: astronomy for the eyes, music for the ears, and both requiring knowledge of numerical proportions. Aristotle criticised the notion that celestial bodies make a sound in moving in the context of his own cosmological model."

source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musica_universalis

see also: Pythagoreanism § Music and harmony

The Word "Catholic" Means Universal

"catholic (adj.) mid-14c., "of the doctrines of the ancient Church" (before the East/West schism), literally "universally accepted," from French catholique, from Church Latin catholicus "universal, general," from Greek katholikos, from phrase kath' holou "on the whole, in general," from kata "about" + genitive of holos "whole" (from PIE root *sol- "whole, well-kept"). Medieval Latin catholicus was practically synonymous with Christian and meant "constituting or conforming to the church, its faith and organization" (as opposed to local sects or heresies). With capital C-, applied by Protestants to the Church in Rome c. 1554, after the Reformation began. General sense of "embracing all, universal" in English is from 1550s. Meaning "not narrow-minded or bigoted" is from 1580s. The Latin word was rendered in Old English as eallgeleaflic."

source: https://www.etymonline.com/word/catholic

Macro & Micro Cosmos Are As One

"Macrocosm and microcosm refers to a vision of cosmos where the part (microcosm) reflects the whole (macrocosm) and vice versa. It is a feature "present in all esoteric schools of thinking", according to scholar Pierre A. Riffard. It is closely associated with Hermeticism and underlies practices such as astrology, alchemy and sacred geometry with its premise of "As Above, So Below". Today, the concept of microcosm has been dominated by sociology to mean a small group of individuals whose behavior is typical of a larger social body encompassing it. A microcosm can be seen as a special kind of epitome. Conversely, a macrocosm is a social body made of smaller compounds. In physics, scale invariance describes the same phenomenon, although the universe as a whole is not physically scale invariant according to the modern understanding. However, scale invariance does appear in some physical systems, such as electrical breakdown. This theory was initiated by Pythagoras who saw the cosmos and the body as a harmonious unity. He expressed this connection with his concept of microcosm and macrocosm."

source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macrocosm_and_microcosm

Seven: The Number of Notes In An Octave

"The most important musical scales are typically written using eight notes, and the interval between the first and last notes is an octave. For example, the C major scale is typically written C D E F G A B C, the initial and final Cs being an octave apart."

source: Octave - Wikipedia

The Ray of Creation & The Law of Octaves

"The Ray of Creation is an esoteric cosmology which was taught by G. I. Gurdjieff. It is a diagram which better represents the place which Earth occupies in the Universe. The diagram has eight levels, each corresponding to Gurdjieff's Law of Octaves (see In Search of the Miraculous, chapter 7)."

"The first level is "The Absolute", followed by "All Worlds", "All Suns", "Sun", "All Planets", "Earth", "Moon", and "The Absolute": The heaviest/last level - "The Absolute". Earth's satellite - "The Moon". Our planet - "Earth". All of the planets in the solar system to which Earth belongs to - "All Planets". The planets belong to the "Sun" or the solar system. The Sun belongs to the Milky Way galaxy or the "All Suns" combined. All galaxies put together belong to "All Worlds". All Worlds form a final whole called "The Absolute". This lineage indicates and compares the construction of all of the levels, matters, and laws of the Universe, placing them in scale with one another."

"It was taught that in "The Absolute" the three holy forces form a whole, and thereby there is only one law (force) in the Absolute (which is the Will of the Absolute). The three forces of this law converge to form "All Worlds", whose level, now, being a part of the whole now has three laws. This level also having three forces, acts in creating "All Suns" in a similar process, and thereby "All Suns" has six laws (three new ones and three of the All Worlds level). Similarly, "Sun" has 12 laws, "All Planets" 24 laws, "Earth" 48 laws, "Moon" 96 laws, and "The Absolute" 192 laws. Each level after the Absolute has a bigger number of laws which govern it. Therefore, the further the level is away from the Absolute, the more mechanical the living things in it are. By this comparison it is claimed that there are 48 laws governing the life of living beings on Earth, thereby also claiming that the life on Earth is quite mechanical. Note that "the three holy forces" above, have manifestations in the physical universe as we know it today, such as are studies by physicists, other scientists. That is, aspects of "The Ray of Creation" as taught by Gurdjieff, Ouspensky, and others, can be understood and described by modern science and scientists. Please also note that "The Absolute" mentioned here does not refer to God as it is normally understood or described by most humans."

"Similarly to the difference of laws on each level, the level (in this case 'density') of matter differs in the same way. "The Absolute" has a matter density of one, "All Worlds" has a density of 3 (one atom of "All Worlds" has a three times the density as one atom of "The Absolute"), "All Suns" 6, "Sun" 12, "All Planets" 24, "Earth" 48, "Moon" 96, "The Absolute" (which in this case represents dead matter) 192. This way everything in the universe according to this cosmology is classified as matter. (Note that even the matter of density 12 is too rarefied for contemporary science to classify it as matter.)"

"Gurdjieff's classification of Higher Bodies can be better represented on this scale. Physical body has the properties of the "Earth" level (that is, it has a density of 48 and it is subject to 48 laws). In comparison, a higher plane body would have a lighter density and it would be subject to a lesser number of laws (the amount varies on the level that the body falls under)."

source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ray_of_Creation

Apollo The Sun God of Music & The Arts: Lord of The Muses

"Apollo – Olympian deity, god of music, poetry, medicine, etc., later identified with Helios, the sun god; the name is a Latin form of Greek Apollon, which is of uncertain origin. Beekes, after considering the alternatives, concludes, "In spite of repeated attempts, there is no IE etymology. ... The name is probably Pre-Greek, and Hitt. Appaliunaš, mentioned in a treaty between Alaksandus of Wilusa and the Hittite king, may well be the Pre-Greek proto-form Apal'un." The U.S. space program ran from 1961 to 1972."

source: https://www.etymonline.com/word/Apollo

800px-The_music_of_the_spheres 5.12.17 PM.jpg

"Engraving from Renaissance Italy (Gafurius's Practica musice, 1496) showing Apollo, the Muses, the planetary spheres and musical modes."

image source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musica_universalis#/media/File:The_music_of_the_spheres.jpg

Origins: Orbital Resonance

"Musica universalis (literally universal music), also called Music of the spheres or Harmony of the Spheres, is an ancient philosophical concept that regards proportions in the movements of celestial bodies—the Sun, Moon, and planets—as a form of musica (the Medieval Latinterm for music). This "music" is not usually thought to be literally audible, but a harmonic, mathematical or religious concept. The idea continued to appeal to thinkers about music until the end of the Renaissance, influencing scholars of many kinds, including humanists. Further scientific exploration has determined specific proportions in some orbital motion, described as orbital resonance."

"The discovery of the precise relation between the pitch of the musical note and the length of the string that produces it is attributed to Pythagoras. The Music of the Spheres incorporates the metaphysical principle that mathematical relationships express qualities or "tones" of energy which manifest in numbers, visual angles, shapes and sounds – all connected within a pattern of proportion. Pythagoras first identified that the pitch of a musical note is in inverse proportion to the length of the string that produces it, and that intervals between harmonious sound frequencies form simple numerical ratios. In a theory known as the Harmony of the Spheres, Pythagoras proposed that the Sun, Moon and planets all emit their own unique hum based on their orbital revolution, and that the quality of life on Earth reflects the tenor of celestial sounds which are physically imperceptible to the human ear. Subsequently, Plato described astronomy and music as "twinned" studies of sensual recognition: astronomy for the eyes, music for the ears, and both requiring knowledge of numerical proportions. Aristotle criticised the notion that celestial bodies make a sound in moving in the context of his own cosmological model."

"The connection between music, mathematics, and astronomy had a profound impact on history. It resulted in music's inclusion in the Quadrivium, the medieval curriculum that included arithmetic, geometry, music, and astronomy, and along with the Trivium (grammar, logic,and rhetoric) made up the seven liberal arts, which are still the basis for higher education today. A small number of recent compositions either make reference to or are based on the concepts of Musica Universalis or Harmony of the Spheres. Among these are Music of the Spheres by Mike Oldfield, Om by the Moody Blues, The Earth Sings Mi Fa Mi album by The Receiving End of Sirens, Music of the Spheres by Ian Brown, and Björk's single Cosmogony, included in her 2011 album Biophilia. Earlier, in the 1910s, Danish composer Rued Langgaard composed a pioneering orchestral work titled Music of the Spheres. Music of the Spheres was also the title chosen for the musical foundation of the video-game Destiny Destiny,and was composed by Marty O'Donnell, Mike Salvarori and Paul McCartney."

quotes and art source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musica_universalis

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo

See Also:

Asteroseismology

Esoteric cosmology

Harmonices Mundi

Orbital resonance

This Is My Father's World

Titius–Bode law

Ray of Creation

Sacred geometry

Shabd

Space music

Thema Mundi

Music Means:

"music (n.) mid-13c., musike, from Old French musique (12c.) and directly from Latin musica "the art of music," also including poetry (also source of Spanish musica, Italian musica, Old High German mosica, German Musik, Dutch muziek, Danish musik), from Greek mousike (techne) "(art) of the Muses," from fem. of mousikos "pertaining to the Muses," from Mousa "Muse" (see muse (n.)). Modern spelling from 1630s. In classical Greece, any art in which the Muses presided, but especially music and lyric poetry. The use of letters to denote music pitch probably is at least as old as ancient Greece, as their numbering system was ill-suited to the job. Natural scales begin at C (not A) because in ancient times the minor mode was more often used than the major one, and the natural minor scale begins at A. Music box is from 1773, originally "barrel organ;" music hall is from 1842, especially "hall licensed for musical entertainment" (1857). To face the music "accept the consequences" is from 1850; the exact image is uncertain, one theory ties it to stage performers, another to cavalry horses having to be taught to stay calm while the regimental band plays. To make (beautiful) music with someone "have sexual intercourse" is from 1967."

source: https://www.etymonline.com/word/music

Muse Means:

"Muse (n.) late 14c., protectors of the arts, from Old French Muse and directly from Latin Musa, from Greek Mousa, "the Muse," also "music, song," from PIE root *men- (1) "to think." Meaning "inspiring goddess of a particular poet" is from late 14c. The traditional names and specialties of the nine Muses, daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne, are: Calliope (epic poetry), Clio (history), Erato (love poetry, lyric art), Euterpe (music, especially flute), Melpomene (tragedy), Polymnia (hymns), Terpsichore(dance), Thalia (comedy), Urania (astronomy)."

source: https://www.etymonline.com/word/muse


Some Ideas To Consider: The Power of Modern Music Idols

Celebrity culture is used as a tool for social management. Individual ego identities are supposed to be derived from the legendary narratives associated with the various types of official celebrity idols that the system offers. I personally do not buy into some of the ideas discussed in the interview below, but I do think this conversation well worth listening to. The soap opera like stories associated with musical idols are great examples of the use of entertainment for social engineering. Various forms of behavior become normalized by means of the various salacious narratives associated with many of the high profile rock star style, musical celebrities. The mainstream news and related publishing based and similar media are the means by which these identity generating and behavior molding narratives are propagated.

“Mark Devlin returns to Our Interesting Times to discuss his book Musical Truth Volume 2. We talk about his research and the growing evidence that the entire entertainment industry is a military-grade operation with the primary objective of societal control. Mark is a UK-based DJ and music journalist.”

via: thkelly67

Celebrity Defined:

"celebrity (n.) late 14c., "solemn rite or ceremony," from Old French celebrité "celebration" or directly from Latin celibritatem (nominative celebritas) "multitude, fame," from celeber"frequented, populous" (see celebrate). Meaning "condition of being famous" is from c. 1600; that of "a famous person" is from 1849. When the old gods withdraw, the empty thrones cry out for a successor, and with good management, or even without management, almost any perishable bag of bones may be hoisted into the vacant seat. [E.R. Dodds, "The Greeks and the Irrational"]"

source: https://www.etymonline.com/word/celebrity

Imagination Defining Idols:

"idol (n.) mid-13c., "image of a deity as an object of (pagan) worship," from Old French idole "idol, graven image, pagan god" (11c.), from Latin idolum "image (mental or physical), form," especially "apparition, ghost," but used in Church Latin for "false god, image of a pagan deity as an object of worship." This is from Greek eidolon "mental image, apparition, phantom," also "material image, statue," in Ecclesiastical Greek," a pagan idol," from eidos"form, shape; likeness, resemblance" (see -oid). A Greek word for "image," used in Jewish and early Christian writers for "image of a false god," hence also "false god." The Germanic languages tended to form a word for it from the reverse direction, from "god" to "false god," hence "image of a false god" (compare Old English afgod, Danish afgud, Swedish avgud, Old High German abgot, compounds with af-/ab- "away, away from" (source of off) + god). The older Greek senses sometimes have been used in English. Figurative sense of "something idolized" is first recorded 1560s (in Middle English the figurative sense was "someone who is false or untrustworthy"). Meaning "a person so adored, human object of adoring devotion" is from 1590s."

sourcehttps://www.etymonline.com/word/idol

Stars, Deified & Defined:

"star (n.) Old English steorra "star," from Proto-Germanic *sterzon (source also of Old Saxon sterro, Old Frisian stera, Dutch ster, Old High German sterro, German Stern, Old Norse stjarna, Swedish stjerna, Danish stierne, Gothic stairno). This is from PIE root *ster- (2) "star."

Astrological sense of "influence of planets and zodiac on human affairs" is recorded from mid-13c., hence "person's fate as figured in the stars" (c. 1600); star-crossed "ill-fated" is from "Romeo and Juliet" (1592). Meaning "lead performer" is from 1824; star turn is from 1898. Stars as a ranking of quality for hotels, restaurants, etc. are attested from 1886, originally in Baedecker guides. Sticker stars as rewards for good students are recorded from 1970s. Brass star as a police badge is recorded from 1859 (New York City). Star-cluster is from 1870. To see stars when one is hit hard on the head is from 1839.

star (v.) 1590s, "to affix a star or asterisk to," from star (n.). From 1718 as "to set with stars." Meaning "perform the lead part" (of actors, singers, etc.) is from 1824. Sporting sense is from 1916. Related: Starred; starring."

source: https://www.etymonline.com/word/star

The Masks of God: Creative Mythology by Joseph Campbell