The Origin of The UN Flat Earth Logo


"The logo and flag of the UN have become its symbols as it carries out its work on the world stage.  They have the practical effect of identifying the United Nations in areas of trouble and conflict to any and all parties concerned.  They are also aspirational symbols, for they speak to the hopes and dreams of people the world over, for peace and unity."

quote and image source: http://www.un.org/en/sections/about-un/un-logo-and-flag/


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"Approval The UN logo was approved on 7 December 1946."

quote and image source: http://www.un.org/en/sections/about-un/un-logo-and-flag/


 "The globe used in the original design was an azimuthal projection focused on the North Pole with the United States, the host nation of the conference, at the centre. The projection that was used cut off portions of the Southern Hemisphere at the latitude of Argentina, which was acceptable at the time, as Argentina was not planned to be an original member of the United Nations. The projection was later altered so that no country will be at prominence within the flag."


"The organizers of the 1945 United Nations Conference on International Organization in San Francisco, California wanted an insignia that could be made into a pin to identify delegates. United States Secretary of State Edward Stettinius, Jr. was chairperson of the U.S. delegation, and realized that a temporary design might become the permanent symbol of the United Nations. He formed a committee headed by Oliver Lundquist that developed a design consisting of a world map surrounded by leaves from a design created by Donal McLaughlin. The blue that appears in the background of the insignia was chosen to be "the opposite of red, the war colour", although the exact shade has never been officially specified by the United Nations. The original colour the group chose in 1945 was a gray blue that differs from the current United Nations flag. The globe used in the original design was an azimuthal projection focused on the North Pole with the United States, the host nation of the conference, at the centre. The projection that was used cut off portions of the Southern Hemisphere at the latitude of Argentina, which was acceptable at the time, as Argentina was not planned to be an original member of the United Nations. The projection was later altered so that no country will be at prominence within the flag. The new logo was now designed so that the globe is bisected in the centre by the Prime Meridian and the International Date Line.

In 1946, a UNO committee got the task of making a definite design, which was presented December 2, 1946, and adopted by the plenary session of the UNO on December 7, 1946. The earlier version had the globe 90 degrees turned eastward compared with the present flag, which has the Prime Meridian and the International Date Line forming the vertical diameter. According to press statements, the change was made to move North America away from the centre of the emblem."

source: Flag of the United Nations - Wikipedia



"When talking of accuracy, a globe is more accurate than the map. Maps may have wide gaps between regions, that are not seen in globes that only give the right measurements. In a map, one can see that the land towards the North Pole is shown larger than they are. It can also be seen that Antarctica is stretched shown as a stretched continent when it is actually round."

source: Difference Between Map and Globe | Difference Between